'She was no longer prepared to go on living': Queen died of a BROKEN HEART after Prince Philip's death

According to royal insider Stewart Pearce, Prince Philip's demise was a 'catalyst' for the Queen's death

'She was no longer prepared to go on living': Queen died of a BROKEN HEART after Prince Philip's death
Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh photographed at Windsor Castle on April 11, 2014 in Windsor, UK (Leon Neal/Getty Images)
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LONDON, ENGLAND: A former royal aide has claimed that the Queen's heartbreak at the loss of her husband was one of the main reasons that led to her passing.

The demise of Prince Philip in April last year was the "catalyst" that diminished Queen Elizabeth II's health and caused her to take a step back from public duties as her energy levels rapidly deteriorated, according to royal insider and Princess Diana's former voice coach Stewart Pearce, who is still on good terms with members of the royal staff and courtiers. The reputed author said he feels "undoubtedly" that Britain's longest serving monarch died of a broken heart after always having had her beloved husband by her side throughout her reign.

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According to Pearce, the royal couple's "extraordinary bond" was kept alive through humor as they balanced royal duties and raising a family while pulling through controversy and scandal. "I believe that the death of Philip was a major catalyst in the eventual passing of Queen Elizabeth. Absolutely. Undoubtedly. He was her rock, stay and support," Pearce told The Sun. "It is interesting she has decided to go seventeen months after his passing. She became more and more frail. It was almost as though the central sun of her universe had been taken away. And she was no longer prepared to go on living."

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Queen Elizabeth ll and Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh arrive in an open carriage on Ladies Day at Royal Ascot on June 16, 2011 in Ascot, England. The five-day meeting is one of the highlights of the horse racing calendar, with 2011 marking the 300th anniversary of the annual event. Horse racing has been held at the famous Berkshire course since 1711.
Queen Elizabeth ll and Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh arrive in an open carriage on Ladies Day at Royal Ascot on June 16, 2011 in Ascot, England. (Photo by Dan Kitwood/Getty Images)

The former royal aide said the Queen likely became overwhelmed with grief after bidding the Duke of Edinburgh goodbye 17 months ago. "She began to see the extraordinary nature of his relationship energetically in the context of her role as monarch," he continued. "And the life force almost left her. It is why she strategically changed a lot of her engagements and moved to a very contemplative, quiet and solitary existence, which I feel has just led her all the way through to the point of her death."

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Queen Elizabeth II waits in the Drawing Room before receiving newly elected leader of the Conservative party Liz Truss at Balmoral Castle for an audience where she will be invited to become Prime Minister and form a new government on September 6, 2022 in Aberdeen, Scotland. The Queen broke with the tradition of meeting the new prime minister and Buckingham Palace, after needing to remain at Balmoral Castle due to mobility issues.
Queen Elizabeth II waits in the Drawing Room before receiving newly elected leader of the Conservative party Liz Truss at Balmoral Castle for an audience where she will be invited to become Prime Minister and form a new government on September 6, 2022 in Aberdeen, Scotland. (Photo by Jane Barlow - WPA Pool/Getty Images)

"It was a gradual dwindling of her life force, which is extraordinary for someone who was so robust all the way through her life and full of the conviction of her role in service and duty," Pearce said, "She was a symbol for not just the nation, but the Commonwealth and the world." He noted how Her Majesty kept her husband's memory alive during her last engagements. "It is interesting the deer stalker cane she carried, she hardly ever used." Pearce explained. "It was his cane. It was her metaphoric representation as well as it being utilitarian. She never really used it to put her weight into it in the way that a senior citizen would actually use a stick. But it was just there representing his presence."

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Pearce, who reportedly worked with Diana to perfect her voice, poise, and expression in her final years, has maintained ties to associates and members of the royal household. He told The Sun of Philip's importance in the Queen's life.

Portrait of Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip, the Duke of Edinburgh, circa 1952. (Photo by Keystone/Hulton Archive/Getty Images)
Portrait of Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip, the Duke of Edinburgh, circa 1952. (Photo by Keystone/Hulton Archive/Getty Images)

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"It was an extraordinary bond and on reflection it was really based on the early years of determining what the two of them could be," he said. "Obviously there was immense love but of course as we all know as we mature love changes. It is a dynamic energy that has its own evolutionary capacity. The question is how do we dedicate ourselves to it?"

Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh laugh during a ceremonial welcome for the State Visit of The President of The United Mexican, Senor Enrique Pena Nieto and Senora Rivera at Horse Guards Parade on March 3, 2015 in London, England.  The Ceremony marks the start of a three day visit to Britain.
Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh laugh during a ceremonial welcome for the State Visit of The President of The United Mexican, Senor Enrique Pena Nieto and Senora Rivera at Horse Guards Parade on March 3, 2015 in London, England. The Ceremony marks the start of a three day visit to Britain. (Photo by Toby Melville - WPA Pool /Getty Images)

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Pearce added, "There was this magnetic force of love between the two of them, which was kindled by loving the absurd. They were always laughing. But at the same time it seems the dynamic mechanisms that they intelligently brought about were elements of compromise and tolerance."

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Disclaimer : This is based on sources and we have been unable to verify this information independently.

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