QAnon supporters vow to leave GOP after Mitch McConnell accepts Joe Biden won 2020 presidential election

The radical movement's followers, who believe President Donald Trump is waging a secret war against satanic pedophiles, denounced the Senate Majority Leader and accused him of being a traitor


                            QAnon supporters vow to leave GOP after Mitch McConnell accepts Joe Biden won 2020 presidential election
(Getty Images)

QAnon supporters appear to have turned against Senator Mitch McConnell after the Republican accepted the results of the 2020 presidential elections and congratulated President-elect Joe Biden on his victory. The radical movement's followers, who believe President Donald Trump is waging a secret war against satanic pedophiles, denounced the Senate Majority Leader and accused him of being a traitor after he acknowledged Biden's win. Some QAnon members even stated that they will abandon the GOP altogether and form a new political party of their own. QAnon has been listed by the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) as a domestic terrorist threat.

President Trump, who over a month after the Election Day, November 3, has still refused to concede to Biden in the presidential race, has claimed massive "voter fraud" in the polls. However, neither his campaign nor his legal team has provided any evidence supporting his claims. 

McConnell, on Tuesday, December 15, announced that the "Electoral College has spoken" and declared that Biden had won a total of 306 Electoral Votes, referring to him as President-elect. Trump, however, denounced the senator in a tweet and stated that it was too soon for the Republican party to give up. He tweeted: "Mitch, 75,000,000 VOTES, a record for a sitting President (by a lot). Too soon to give up. Republican Party must finally learn to fight. People are angry!"

Trump tweeted his message to the Kentucky senator along with an article detailing multiple high-profile conservative figures who also criticized McConnell for accepting Biden as the next president. Several QAnon supporters also took to Twitter to accuse McConnell of working for the "deep state" and referred to him as a "RINO" [Republican in name only.]

One user @Nadler_a, a Twitter account with "digital soldiers" in the bio, a popular phrase which refers to followers of QAnon, wrote: "Congratulations b*tch McConnell today marked the death knell of the GOP because of your treasonous actions telling party members not to back trump. Today marks the birth The AMERICA FIRST PARTY when the party leaders refuse to lead .. leave the party."



 

Roger Stone's former social media consultant, Jason Sullivan, formally announced the launch of the Great American Party (GAP) shortly after McConnell's comments about Biden. He began his announcement by addressing "patriots," which is a common word used by a lot of QAnon supporters. He wrote: "TODAY our political establishments have abandoned us all. TODAY, we stand at the precipice of a new day in American patriotism as the establishments have NOT only failed us, they have deliberately led us astray," Sullivan tweeted. "TODAY, the sleeping giant has awakened and out of the ashes of this GREAT AWAKENING will rise, like a Phoenix, a new party, an army of Patriots who are all more than willing to STAND IN THE GAP to defend her. An army of Patriots who are willing to risk it all." Stone, a longtime ally of Trump, previously suggested that he hopes QAnon is real and recently accused outgoing attorney general Bill Barr of working with the "deep state."



 

The host of the conspiracy theory podcast Steel Truth, Ann Vandesteel, an outspoken QAnon believer, also shared Sullivan's call for a new party. 

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