Pussy Riot release new single with a flashy music video days after FIFA protest: Watch

Days after their high-profile protest at the final game of FIFA World Cup 2018 in Moscow on July 15, Pussy Riot have now released a new single titles 'Track About Good Cop'


                            Pussy Riot release new single with a flashy music video days after FIFA protest: Watch

Now that they've got the world's attention, thanks to their high-profile protest at the final game of FIFA World Cup 2018 in Moscow on July 15, Pussy Riot has no intention of slowing down. The Russian protest-punk outfit has unveiled a catchy new single.

Titled 'Track About Good Cop', the track comes with its own flashy music video and is rife with references to their political statement “Policeman enters the game,” which contrasted the differences between a “heavenly policeman” and the “earthly policeman,” while alluding to the works of Russian poet Dmitriy Prigov, who the band claim "created an image of a policeman, a carrier of the heavenly nationhood, in the Russian culture."

Jokingly credited to Russia’s Ministry of Internal Affairs, the clip features Russian cops dancing in the snow, all while the group sings about a would-be world filled with “boys and girls” and “sugary streets,” where “cops are kissing under the clouds.”

It's another instance of the sharp, bizarre political commentary against the Russian state that the band has now become a flagbearer of and comes with a barrage of flashing lights and English subtitles. Check out the music video below (WARNING: The music video may potentially trigger seizures for people with photosensitive epilepsy. Viewer discretion is advised.)

It also looks like 'Track About Good Cop' is not a stand-alone effort. As Crack Magazine points out, Pussy Riot is all set to release two more tracks titled ‘КОШМАРЫ / NIGHTMARES’ and ‘PONG!’ to be self-released this Wednesday. In an interview with Crack, the band’s Nadya Tolokonnikova and Nikita Chaika say that their new material is inspired by the tradition of the Russian prison chanson – folk ballads written by inmates. “They belong to everybody, and they have proven to be an amazing tool of empowerment: A good old song that’s making fun of prison guards can lift your spirit in a sad moment and, thus, literally save your life,” said Tolokonnikova in the interview.

“Spirit is pretty much the only one thing that keeps you alive in Russian prison. Building an alternative universe in prisoners’ folklore helps to keep valuing and respecting yourself as a human being, even if you’re living in a fucking nightmarish hell.”

Described by Crack as “pummelling, strobe-y hardcore club and gabber tracks”, the new songs will come accompanied with animations by Moscow artist 9cyka. They list Death Grips, Ho99o9 and Kim Gordon among their current influences.

Meanwhile, in related news, Pussy Riot have won their case against the Russian government in the European Court of Human Rights. On Tuesday, the court condemned Russia for its treatment of the band following their now-iconic 2012 protests at a Moscow cathedral, which saw members Maria Alyokhina and Nadezhda Tolokonnikova incarcerated for nearly two years.

As the BBC reports, the court determined that Russia violated five articles of the human rights convention, referencing the band’s “overcrowded conditions” during transportation, the “humiliation” of their trial in a glass dock, their extended detention before trial, lack of access to a lawyer, and freedom of expression for banning access to their videos.

Pussy Riot gained global notoriety when five members of the group were arrested after they staged a performance inside Moscow's Cathedral of Christ the Savior in 201. (Image Source: Twitter/@Pussyrrriot)
Pussy Riot gained global notoriety when five members of the group were arrested after they staged a performance inside Moscow's Cathedral of Christ the Savior in 201. (Image Source: Twitter/@Pussyrrriot)

According to Reuters, the court has ordered Russia to pay a total of 48,760 euros in damages and judicial expenses. Although the court “accepted that a reaction to breaching the rules of conduct in a place of religious worship might have been warranted,” they argued: “That sentencing them to imprisonment for simply having worn brightly colored clothes, waved their arms and kicked their legs around and used strong language, without analyzing the lyrics of their song or the context of their performance, had been exceptionally severe.”

Currently, Russia’s Justice Ministry insists the ruling has not yet taken effect and that they have three months to decide if they want to appeal.