President Trump falsely claims Wisconsin mothers are legally allowed to 'execute' their babies while talking about late-term abortions

Trump was trying to explain his understanding of Governor Tony Evers' plans to veto a Republican-authored bill that can imprison doctors for life if they do not give medical attention to babies born after a failed abortion attempt


                            President Trump falsely claims Wisconsin mothers are legally allowed to 'execute' their babies while talking about late-term abortions

President Donald Trump on Saturday falsely claimed that mothers in Wisconsin are given the choice to legally "execute" their babies after they are born. The president made the claim during a raucous rally in Green Bay, Wisconsin while talking at length about late-term abortions. 

Trump, on Saturday night, was trying to explain his understanding of Governor Tony Evers' plans to veto a Republican-authored bill that can imprison doctors for life. According to the proposed bill, medical experts can be sentenced for life if they do not give medical attention to babies born after a failed abortion attempt, the Daily Mail reported.

U.S. President Donald Trump talks with journalists before departing the White House March 20, 2019 in Washington, DC. Trump is traveling to Ohio where he will visit a tank manufacturer and participate in a fundraiser. (Getty Images)

 

Trump, while talking to his supporters, said: "Your Democrat governor here in Wisconsin, shockingly, stated that he will veto legislation that protects Wisconsin babies born alive."

"The baby is born, the mother meets with the doctor, they take care of the baby, they wrap the baby beautifully, and then the doctor and the mother determine whether or not they will execute the baby," Trump falsely claimed while giving a narrative of how the scenario could pan out.

"You hear late term, but this is where the baby is actually born, it came out, it's there, it's wrapped - and that's it," the president said while using a chopping motion with his arm.

Tony Evers, Democratic candidate for governor of Wisconsin, speaks at a rally in support of Wisconsin Democrats at North Division High School on October 26, 2018 in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Former President Barack Obama also spoke at the event. (Getty Images)

 

Trump's comments came after the Wisconsin governor, earlier this month, vowed to veto the controversial bill. Evers, in a statement, said that he would not sign the bill because of existing protections and criminal penalties in state law. The governor added that the bill was introduced in an attempt to "create division."

According to the bill, health care providers present during a failed abortion attempt are required to "exercise the same degree of professional skill, care, and diligence to preserve the life and health of the child as a reasonably diligent and conscientious health care provider would render to any other child born alive."

Failing to do so could lead to felony charges and penalties up to life in prison. A similar bill was vetoed by North Carolina's Democratic governor this month.