Trump blames 'sick' Minneapolis cops and coronavirus for bad polls, asks 'why does everything happen to me?'

White House insiders claim advisers are attempting to lift POTUS' spirit while he decries 'fake news' that never gives him credit for anything


                            Trump blames 'sick' Minneapolis cops and coronavirus for bad polls, asks 'why does everything happen to me?'
(Getty Images)
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President Donald Trump is reportedly blaming the "sick and twisted" former Minneapolis officers who were involved in George Floyd's killing and the current coronavirus crisis for his plummeting poll numbers, according to White House insiders. The president's advisers, meanwhile, are attempting to lift the embattled Republican leader's spirit. 

The insiders, while talking to The Washington Post, suggested that Trump often talks about how coronavirus is destroying "the greatest economy," which he reportedly claims that he built personally. He also decries the "fake news" media, which never gives him credit for anything and calls it "unfair". The insiders also revealed that he bemoans the "sick, twisted" officers in Minneapolis whose actions led to countrywide Black Lives Matter demonstrations over Gorge Floyd's killing on May 25. Trump, on Thursday, July 9, in a series of tweets had also attacked the Supreme Court after they ruled against him, stating that the Manhattan district attorney could have access to the president's financial records. The top court had also added that Congressional committees could potentially also access those records.

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The Republican had tweeted: "This is about PROSECUTORIAL MISCONDUCT. We catch the other side SPYING on my campaign, the biggest political crime and scandal in U.S. history, and NOTHING HAPPENS." 

U.S. President Donald Trump waves while departing after speaking about the White House Hispanic Prosperity Initiative in the Rose Garden July 9, 2020 in Washington, DC. Trump met with Hispanic leaders earlier in the day in the Cabinet Room. (Getty Images)

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A former executive at the Trump Organization, while talking to The Post, said that the Republican leader's feeling of being victimized was a common trait, and that when she worked for Trump, he interpreted nearly everything in personal terms. She said: "Whatever bad happened, no matter what it was, it was always against him, always directed at him. He would say, 'Why does everything always happen to me?'"

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"It was as if the world revolved around him. Everything that happened had an effect on him, good or bad," she added. The outlet reported that the president's son-in-law Jared Kushner was attempting to soothe him during the time with the assistance of Hope Hicks, who is a counselor to the president. Trump's aides said that Hicks, with assistance from communications adviser Dan Scavino, has lately attempted "to cheer Trump's mood" by holding events he might enjoy, like celebrating truckers by bringing 18-wheelers onto the White House South Lawn in April or formulating social media posts featuring is fans. 

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Trump's advisers also attempted to pacify him by giving him with internal polling numbers that project him in a better position than public surveys, which have shown his political rival former Vice President Joe Biden, the presumptive Democratic nominee leading. 

Meanwhile, White House spokesperson Judd Deere, in a statement, said that the president was currently focused on the "Transition to Greatness", and was promoting a message of "resilience, hope and optimism." Deere said: "The United States of America did not ask for this plague and every American has been affected from the closure of our economy to caring for the sick and mourning those tragically lost. But under the leadership of President Trump our Transition to Greatness has already begun, and the American people are showing tremendous courage to defeat the virus, responsibly open the economy, and restore law and order to our streets."

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