'Pose' greenlit for UK audience: Here's why Ryan Murphy's groundbreaking series is a must watch

The series didn't necessarily make waves when it first aired but it made history by assembling TV's largest LGBTQ+ cast and crew. This show definitely deserves more recognition.


                            'Pose' greenlit for UK audience: Here's why Ryan Murphy's groundbreaking series is a must watch

Ryan Murphy's critically acclaimed FX series 'Pose,' has been greenlit for the UK and will premiere on BBC Two on March 21, at 10 p.m. The show has already created waves globally, not just for the awards it keeps bagging, but also because it is the only show to cast over 130 LGBTQ+ actors and crew. 

Set in the backdrop of 1980s New York ballroom drag culture, 'Pose' follows several characters as they navigate through various social scenes fraught by difficulties of the Reagan era. Addressed as a musical, there's glitz, glamour, a thrilling heist and showdowns at different ball houses, but there's also an unparalleled stroke of harsh reality as our endeared characters battle the AIDS epidemic, and the show, at large, looms with a lot of political references to the current scenario.

The series first premiered last June, and the show has gained high acclaim, and if you haven't watched Ryan Murphy's most ambitious series to date, then this is the time for you to catch on before season two premieres later this year.

Let me give you even more reason to watch the show.

A true representation

(L-R) MJ Rodriguez, Hailie Sahar, Dominique Jackson, Janet Mock, Angelica Ross, and Charlayne Woodard attend the FX 'Pose' Ball in Harlem on June 2, 2018 in New York City. (Getty Images)
(L-R) MJ Rodriguez, Hailie Sahar, Dominique Jackson, Janet Mock, Angelica Ross, and Charlayne Woodard attend the FX 'Pose' Ball in Harlem on June 2, 2018 in New York City. (Getty Images)

The show does not shy away from addressing cruel realities the trans community faced, and still faces. From the leading stars to the writers, almost all of them belong to the queer community and the show is dedicated to telling their story, in their own way.

Trans activist and author Janet Mock works on the show as a writer-producer and Our Lady J (whose past credits include 'Transparent') works behind the scenes, so there aren't many questions on the authenticity of the plot and with stars like MJ Rodriguez and Billy Porter, the delivery is just as strikingly genuine. With so many voices, the show is impactfully ingenious woven together with a creative plotline. 

Trans people of color are represented in the show set in 1980s New York and that is another noteworthy aspect. Our characters elegantly sail through hardships, and even when they are considered outcasts, they manage to build a home in an unwelcoming world.

Added to that, some of the main characters are fighting and losing the battle with AIDS, and that shows the kind of crisis the community was in. The government did very little to help the community because as said in the series, getting rid of the so-called "sinners" was, in fact, a matter of victory.

There was no help available and they were in dire need. People used the members of the community in a clandestine manner and gender confirmation surgery often put them off the market. In the real world, fraught with real problems, they could hardly be themselves despite losing everything they had to become who they wanted to be.

The outstanding cast and crew

Billy Porter attends the 91st Annual Academy Awards at Hollywood and Highland on February 24, 2019 in Hollywood, California. (Getty Images)
Billy Porter attends the 91st Annual Academy Awards at Hollywood and Highland on February 24, 2019 in Hollywood, California. (Getty Images)

Red carpets events have been Billy Porter's to own. In the show, Porter plays Pray Tell, a fashion designer and an emcee in the underground ballroom culture. Tell's beautiful friendship with MJ Rodriguez's Blanca breaks and mends your heart at the same time.

There's Elektra Abundance played by Dominique Jackson, and though supposed to be a villainous character, she is anything but one dimensional. Indya Moore portrays Angel, a sex worker caught up in an emotional turmoil with a white corporate man, played by Ryan Murphy regular, Evan Peters. In terms of writing, all credit goes to Janet Mock and Our Lady J, who scripted the show on the basis of their own experiences as trans women.

A must-watch 

When was the last time you saw a show bring together a marginalized group making them the soul of the show without much pity? 'Pose' does that. It does not command you to feel a certain way about the community and each character stands out to be their own authentic selves. Getting together in the ballroom, which is a place of "gatherings of people who are not welcome together anywhere else," the show celebrates the community and there's drama like any other show, except this time it's magnificent.

With a hint of nostalgia of the 80s, and the competitions, voguing and dancing will definitely make you rethink and love the world you live in today, with Ru-Paul's Emmy winning show and Madonna's own voguing moves, we can say we've come a long way. But, of course, there's a long way to go and with 'Pose' marking television history, we know we are on the right track.