Pornhub star Jenni Lee is now homeless and lives in a Las Vegas tunnel with no running water

Once a top-rated actor in the adult industry, Lee is still ranked 119th on Pornhub's list of best actresses and had clocked close to 135 million views on the website.


                            Pornhub star Jenni Lee is now homeless and lives in a Las Vegas tunnel with no running water

A famous porn star who was once one of the most in-demand actors in the adult industry is now homeless and living in the tunnels in Las Vegas.

Stephanie Sadorra, who most might know by her porn name Jenni Lee, was found to be living underneath the Las Vegas strip by a Dutch news program that was working on a documentary about the city's winding network of tunnels which hundreds call home.

 

Sadorra, who is practically unrecognizable from her days in the adult entertainment industry, was identified because she admitted to the interviewer that she used to be a famous porn star.

"I actually got very famous. Maybe a little too famous. I should still be in the top 100 on some list somewhere," she said, adding with a laugh, "I used to be so hot."

Despite her absence from the porn industry for more than a decade, Sadorra is still ranked 119th on Pornhub's list of best porn actresses. She has clocked close to 135 million views on the adult website and her profile still has around 45,000 subscribers.

The 37-year-old, who hails from Clarksville, Tennessee, and is of mixed Irish, German, and Puerto Rican descent, had first begun performing in explicit hardcore movies at the age of 21.

She went on to appear in X-rated pictures for major companies such as Hustler, Penthouse, Combat Zone, New Sensations, and Adam and Eve and was nominated for an AVN Award for Best Couples Sex Scene - Video in 2008.

She retired in 2009 to concentrate on a career as a professional model but found herself sidelined by a debilitating drug and gambling addiction if reports are to be believed.

While it is unclear how long Sadorra has been homeless or made her way into the tunnels - where there is no access to running water - she said she's happy living underground as the community was very tight-knit and more accepting.

When she's asked if she thinks she could leave the tunnel and go back up above ground, she replies, "Yeah, I do. But why?"

"It's not as difficult as you might think, everybody's really respectful," she said. "Everybody's good to each other, which I don't think you find much [above ground]. I'm happy, I have everything I need here."

Sadorra then told the interviewer that "hardships build camaraderie" and that she believed living underground had allowed her to make genuine friends.

Watch the interview with Sadorra here:



 

 



If you have a news scoop or an interesting story for us, please reach out at (323) 421-7514