Paul Simon calls it quits, says he's 'finished' writing music

“I think after 'Stranger to Stranger', a funny thing happened when I finished — I literally felt like a switch clicked and I said, 'I'm finished.'”


                            Paul Simon calls it quits, says he's 'finished' writing music

With his farewell tour just about to wrap up soon, Paul Simon has suggested that his six-decade-long songwriting career might finally be "finished".

“Well, I haven't written a new song in a couple of years now,” the Rock and Roll Hall of Famer said in a recent interview with NPR. “I think after [2016 album] 'Stranger to Stranger', a funny thing happened when I finished — I literally felt like a switch clicked and I said, 'I'm finished.'”

Whether Simon actually intends to completely cut off from his music career remains to be seen. But judging by the NPR interview, Simon is definitely treating his final performances and new album as a conclusion to a prolific career that has produced 14 studio albums, an additional 5 with Art Garfunkel as a part of Simon & Garfunkel and a Broadway musical (The Capeman). Along the way, he has picked up a staggering 16 Grammy Awards and also wrote and starred in the 1980 film 'One-Trick Pony'.

Simon has another album slated for release this Friday, September 7, titled 'In the Blue Light'. But the record is a "reimagining" of 10 previously written songs Simon wanted to "revisit," NPR explains, rather than a cache of new material.

Meanwhile, in the same interview, Simon said that he has been ruminating on the "great mysteries of life". 

"We don't have the capacity to understand the great mysteries of life and God or no God or infinity, we just can't get it. It's beyond us, but that's fine," the 'Sound of Silence' hit-maker explains. "We're not meant to get that. But the pursuit is so interesting. That, I think, it's life-sustaining and I think when you lose the interest in that pursuit you're finished."

Listen to Simon's full interview below via NPR's 'All Songs Considered' segment.