Parkland shooting survivor questioned by school authorities for visiting gun range with father

The teenager posted pictures and videos of himself holding an AR-15 rifle as he was instructed by trainers on how to use the weapon


                            Parkland shooting survivor questioned by school authorities for visiting gun range with father
A 19-year-old former student of Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, Nikolas Cruz, opened fire on campus, killing 17 people. (Source: Getty Images)

A teenager, who survived the Parkland shooting in Florida, was questioned by his school security for visiting a sun range with his father, according to reports. The student of Stoneman Doulas is reportedly anti-gun control.

A nationwide gun control movement was sparked by the survivors of the Parkland school shooting in February this year. A 19-year-old former student of Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, Nikolas Cruz, opened fire on campus with his legally bought AR-15 rifle, killing 17 people. Most of his victims included students and teachers.

One of the survivors of the massacre, Kyle Kashuv, reportedly went to a gun range with his father on Friday for the first time, in an effort to learn how to fire a gun, according to the Daily Mail.

The teenager posted pictures and videos of himself holding an AR-15 rifle as he was instructed by trainers on how to use the weapon.

Kashuv posted a tweet about the experience and wrote: "It was great learning about our inalienable right of #2A and how to properly use a gun," he said, while referring to the Second Amendment.

"This was my first time ever touching a gun and it made me appreciate the #Constitution even more. My instructor was very informative; I learnt a lot. #2A is important and we need 2 preserve 2A," the student added.

Although Kashuv believed that his visit to the gun range was harmless, school students did not think so. When Kashuv arrived at the school on Monday, multiple students slammed him for going to the gun range and asked him to see the armed resource officer of the school.

Parkland students participating in a demonstration to ask for stricter gun legislation in the country. (Getty Images)

The school principal reportedly told Kashuv that there were some students who were upset by his Twitter posts, however, he had not done anything wrong, according to the Daily Wire.

The teenager claimed that the security officers treated him like a "criminal."

"Both began questioning me intensely. First, they began berating my tweet, although neither of them had read it; then they began aggressively asking questions about who I went to the range with, whose gun we used, about my father, etc," the student claimed.

Kashuv claimed that a third officer form the Broward County Sheriff's Office also walked in later and questioned him again.

"At that point, I asked whether I could record the interview. They said no. I asked if I had done anything wrong. Again, they answered no. I asked why I was there. One said, 'Don't get snappy with me, do you not remember what happened here a few months ago?'" Kashuv said.