Parkland school cameras were rewound 30 minutes making cops think gunman was still inside when he had already escaped

A gunman opened fire at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida on February 14, 2018, killing seventeen students and staff members and injuring seventeen others.


                            Parkland school cameras were rewound 30 minutes making cops think gunman was still inside when he had already escaped

A new report has stated that the police response to the Parkland school shooting was delayed by nearly 30 minutes because school officials rewound a surveillance video, which made the officers think that the gunman was still inside the building. 

A gunman opened fire at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida on February 14, 2018, killing seventeen students and staff members and injuring seventeen others. The gunman was later identified as 19-year-old Nikolas Cruz, a former student at the school. Cruz was later charged with 17 counts of premeditated murder and was convicted of first-degree murder.

People are brought out of the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School after a shooting at the school that reportedly killed and injured multiple people on February 14, 2018 in Parkland, Florida. Numerous law enforcement officials continue to investigate the scene.
People are brought out of the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School after a shooting at the school that reportedly killed and injured multiple people on February 14, 2018 in Parkland, Florida. Numerous law enforcement officials continue to investigate the scene.

The latest documents show that the assistant principal at Marjory Stoneman Douglas, Jeff Morford, and security officer, Kelvin Greenleaf, began viewing a live stream from inside of the building minutes after the shooting stopped, according to the South Florida Sun-Sentinel.  When they could not spot the gunman, they rewound the video until they found him and then gave the information about to Broward Sheriff's Deputy Scot Peterson, who radioed officers who had charged into the building.

Officers, at one point, were told the suspect was coming down the stairs when he had already left the building 30 minutes earlier and had abandoned his AR-15 semi-automatic rifle at the premises. Officials, while talking to investigators, said that the piece of information delayed their arrival on the third floor, where multiple students were found dead and wounded, according to reports.

Florida school shooting suspect Nikolas Cruz quickly glances up at the prosecutors during a hearing on April 27, 2018, in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. (Photo by Taimy Alvarez-Pool/Getty Images)
Florida school shooting suspect Nikolas Cruz quickly glances up at the prosecutors during a hearing on April 27, 2018, in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. (Photo by Taimy Alvarez-Pool/Getty Images)

One of the deputies said that one of the girls he found had a pulse but she was dead by the time they got her outside of the premises. Coral Springs police SWAT officer George Schmidt told investigators: "Had we known the shooter wasn't there, we probably could have flooded that building a lot faster knowing that we're just going to go in there and just start trying to recover victims and wounded people."

 Nikolas Cruz, 19, a former student at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, where he allegedly killed 17 people, is seen on a closed circuit television screen during a bond hearing in front of Broward Judge Kim Mollica at the Broward County Courthouse on February 15, 2018 in Fort Lauderdale, Florida.  (Photo by Susan Stocker - Pool/Getty Images)
 Nikolas Cruz, 19, a former student at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, where he allegedly killed 17 people, is seen on a closed circuit television screen during a bond hearing in front of Broward Judge Kim Mollica at the Broward County Courthouse on February 15, 2018 in Fort Lauderdale, Florida.  (Photo by Susan Stocker - Pool/Getty Images)

Even though the video delay came to light months ago, it was not exactly clear how the misunderstanding occurred.  It was also not clear whether the assistant principal informed Peterson that the information he was relaying to him was 30 minutes old.