Lori Loughlin's YouTube star daughter admits her parents forced her to go to college, says her dad 'faked' his way through his college

Olivia Jade Giannulli has been slammed ever since her parents were charged for paying $500,000 to send her and sister Isabella to the University of Southern California


                            Lori Loughlin's YouTube star daughter admits her parents forced her to go to college, says her dad 'faked' his way through his college

Actress Lori Loughlin's YouTube star daughter admitted in an interview just last week that her parents had forced her to go to college and alleged that her father "faked his way" through college by using the money he had to pay tuition to start his design business. The 19-year-old Olivia Jade Giannulli has been drawing flak online ever since both her parents were charged on March 12 for paying $500,000 to make sure she and her 20-year-old sister Isabella got into the University of Southern California.

Loughlin and husband Mossimo Giannulli had allegedly paid to have both their children labeled as USC crew team recruits even though neither of the girls was a rower. Olivia has since been in the spotlight for "ignorant" comments that she made about college, including an interview in the Zach Sang Show where she had confessed that she only went because she was forced by her parents, according to a Daily Mail report.



 

She said in the interview before joking that her parents were "hypocrites": "Mostly my parents really wanted me to go because both of them didn't go to college... I think they did fine. I'm so happy they made me go, that sounds so terrible. They didn't make me. My sister goes to the same school and we're pretty much inseparable."

Later on, in the same interview, Olivia spoke about how her dad was the one who inspired her and revealed that Giannulli had "faked" his way through college. She said: "He, like, built his whole entire brand and he wasn't actually, like — I don't know if I'm supposed to say this — ever enrolled in college. But he, like, faked his way through it and started his business with tuition money that his parents thought was going to college."

She continued: "That's, like, such a different time. I don't know if I was supposed to say that, but it's okay. So he started Mossimo then and it sold to Target. He was a baller." The young YouTube star previously made some controversial comments when she revealed to her millions of followers on the streaming platform that she didn't "really care about school" and just wanted to experience "game days and partying".



 

Olivia had posted a video on her YouTube channel on the day she was supposed to start college sometime last year, saying: "I don't know how much of school I'm gonna attend. But I'm gonna go in and talk to my deans and everyone, and hope that I can try and balance it all. But I do want the experience of like game days, partying… I don't really care about school, as you guys all know." 

The teen was forced to apologize a few days later after her viewers slammed her for being "ignorant" and "spoiled".

The 19-year-old didn't let the opportunity to make some money go during her brief stint at USC. She posted an image on her Instagram page which was sponsored content for Amazon Prime in September last year which showed her sitting inside her USC dorm room. The post caption read: "'Officially a college student! It's been a few weeks since I moved into my dorm and I absolutely love it. I got everything I needed from Amazon with @primestudent and had it all shipped to me in just two days".

Lori Loughlin and husband Mossimo Giannulli attend Paul Frank's celebration of Fashion's Night Out at ADBD Gallery on September 8, 2011, in Los Angeles, California. (Source: Michael Bezjian/Getty Images)
Lori Loughlin and husband Mossimo Giannulli attend Paul Frank's celebration of Fashion's Night Out at ADBD Gallery on September 8, 2011, in Los Angeles, California. (Source: Michael Bezjian/Getty Images)

A USC Trojans flag could still be seen waving outside her parent's 10-bedroom mansion that overlooks the Bel Air Country Club even as the charges against them broke on March 12. Loughlin and Giannulli, who tied the knot in 1997, had listed the property for sale in 2017 for $35 million. Giannulli has now used the home as collateral in order to make bail on Tuesday.

Loughlin had turned herself in to the FBI on March 13 morning and a federal judge then allowed her to be released from custody after she posted the $1 million bail. The pair were two out of 50 parents and coaches who were charged on March 12 in a scam to get their children into elite schools including Georgetown, Stanford, UCLA, University of San Diego, USC, University of Texas, Wake Forest and Yale.



The scheme basically involved the parents paying bribes that ranged between $100,000 to $2.5 million to get their children into top schools in the country. In many of these instances, authorities have said that the children didn't know that their parents had paid the bribes.

MEA WorldWide (MEAWW) previously reported that actress Felicity Huffman was among dozens named in a huge college admissions and testing scam that was unveiled by federal prosecutors.

(L-R) Olivia Jade Giannulli, Lori Loughlin and Isabella Rose Giannulli attend The Women's Cancer Research Fund's An Unforgettable Evening Benefit Gala at the Beverly Wilshire Four Seasons Hotel on February 28, 2019, in Beverly Hills, California. (Source: Frazer Harrison/Getty Images)
(L-R) Olivia Jade Giannulli, Lori Loughlin and Isabella Rose Giannulli attend The Women's Cancer Research Fund's An Unforgettable Evening Benefit Gala at the Beverly Wilshire Four Seasons Hotel on February 28, 2019, in Beverly Hills, California. (Source: Frazer Harrison/Getty Images)

According to the criminal complaint that was filed, the 'Desperate Housewives' star reportedly paid a "purported charitable contribution of $15,000" to a nonprofit called Key Worldwide Foundation, which was actually in connection "to participate in the college entrance exam cheating scheme on behalf of her oldest daughter".

Most of the adults who were charged either paid bribes to get higher SAT scores for their children or faked an athletic resume. The 58-year-old William "Rick" Singer was charged by federal prosecutors in Boston with running the racketeering scheme though Edge College & Career Network. His clients included actors and chief executives.