New York state bill would allow prisoners to be jailed near their children

Multiple studies have shown that inmates who have frequent visitors are 13 percent less likely to commit a felony and 25 percent less likely to be back behind bars due to parole violations.


                            New York state bill would allow prisoners to be jailed near their children

New York State prison inmates' lives are likely to be made easier after the implementation of a Democratic-sponsored legislation that will see prisoners being placed near their children, according to reports.

An Assembly bill calling for the measure to be instated is expected to move out of Assembly Corrections Committee on Tuesday. Reports state that in a first, a similar bill has already been passed by a Senate committee.

Assemblywoman Nily Rozic (D-Queens), who sponsored the bill, while talking to the New York Post, said: "This is the first year that we can get some traction, and I think when you’re talking about [lower] recidivism and full re-entry [into society], there’s a bipartisan thought process, and it’s palatable to rally around." 

Reports state that the bill would have to be approved by the legislative leadership to make it to the floor for a full vote. However, the legislation's supporters are hopeful considering the penchant of the current leaders for criminal-justice reforms. 

“We have some amendments that we made that will give it a nice balance between what is feasible for incarcerated families and DOCCS [Department of Corrections and Community Supervision],” Rozic said.



 

 

The amended legislation calls for the DOCCS to develop "procedures and criteria for assessing such placement" and requires an annual report to be made in an effort to keep tabs on the inmates' families.

According to the US Centers for Disease Control, over 100,000 children in New York have a parent in prison, and the situation has been recognized as an "Adverse Childhood Experience" by the federal agency.

Multiple studies have also shows that inmates who have frequent visitors are less likely to offend again. According to nonprofit Osborne Association, incarcerated parents were 13 percent less likely to commit a felony and 25 percent less likely to be back behind bars due to parole violations.

There a toal of 46,900 prisoners in New York’s 54 facilities, with 36,344 parolees under supervision in the state.