Queen Mother was annoyed with Prince Philip when he installed phones at Buckingham Palace, new documentary claims

The Queen Mother was also wary of Prince Philip because she thought he bullied his son Charles and failed to appreciate how sensitive he was


                            Queen Mother was annoyed with Prince Philip when he installed phones at Buckingham Palace, new documentary claims

According to a new documentary on the British royal family, the relationship between Queen Mother and Prince Philip was not always very pleasant. One of the major disagreements they had was over the Duke of Edinburgh's decision to install telephones in Buckingham Palace instead of having footmen messengers deliver news to the royals.

The 97-year-old reportedly used to clash with his mother-in-law in the 1950s after he sacked the footmen who used to take messages from one royal to another. The documentary, titled 'The Queen Mum: The Reluctant Queen', which is set to air on Saturday on Channel 5, claims that the royal pair "never really got on".

Qaboos Bin Said Al Said (second right), the Sultan of Muscat and Oman, with Queen Elizabeth II (right), the Queen Mother and the Duke of Edinburgh, at a banquet held in the Sultan's honor at Buckingham Palace, London, March 17th 1982. (Photo by Geoff Bruce/Central Press/Getty Images)
Qaboos Bin Said Al Said (second right), the Sultan of Muscat and Oman, with Queen Elizabeth II (right), the Queen Mother and the Duke of Edinburgh, at a banquet held in the Sultan's honor at Buckingham Palace, London, March 17th 1982. (Photo by Geoff Bruce/Central Press/Getty Images)

One insider even revealed that the Queen Mother, had a dislike for Philip's "progressive" attitude when it came to matters of technology. As royal fans would know, the Duke was famously the brains behind the decision to broadcast his wife's coronation on TV in 1953.

The documentary further claimed that the Queen Mother resented moving out of Buckingham Palace to the "small and horrid" confines of Clarence House, which currently acts as the residence of Prince Charles, Duke of Wales, and his wife Camilla Parker Bowles, Duchess of Cornwall, reports Daily Mail.

Prince Charles, Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip pose for photographers after the ceremony of Charles' investiture as Prince of Wales at Caernarfon Castle, Gwynedd, Wales, 1st July 1969. On the left are Princess Margaret, the Queen Mother, and Princess Anne. (Photo by Fox Photos/Hulton Archive/Getty Images
Prince Charles, Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip pose for photographers after the ceremony of Charles' investiture as Prince of Wales at Caernarfon Castle, Gwynedd, Wales, 1st July 1969. On the left are Princess Margaret, the Queen Mother, and Princess Anne. (Photo by Fox Photos/Hulton Archive/Getty Images

Speaking of the Queen Mother, who died aged 101 in 2002, biographer Robert Lacey said: "There she was unashamedly harking back to when Britain had an empire – charming, aristocratic, frankly snobbish, no pretense of actually living in the 20th century."

Nonetheless, this isn't the first time that the Queen Mother and her tumultuous relationship with Philip has been spoken about. In another documentary, 'The Royal House of Windsor' the narrator says: "The Queen Mother was wary of Prince Philip. She thought he bullied his son and failed to appreciate how sensitive he was."

Britain's Prince Andrew, Prince Charles, Prince Phillip, Princess Anne and Prince Edward with Viscount Linley, Prince William, Prince Harry and Peter Phillips watch as pallbearers carry the Royal coffin at the state funeral of the Queen Mother April 9, 2002 outside Westminster Abbey in London. (Photo by Sion Touhig/Getty Images)
Britain's Prince Andrew, Prince Charles, Prince Phillip, Princess Anne and Prince Edward with Viscount Linley, Prince William, Prince Harry and Peter Phillips watch as pallbearers carry the Royal coffin at the state funeral of the Queen Mother April 9, 2002 outside Westminster Abbey in London. (Photo by Sion Touhig/Getty Images)

However, unlike her mother, Queen Elizabeth seems to have no qualms in accepting technology as it keeps changing, and the monarch even composed her first ever Instagram post recently to share an image of a letter sent to her great-great-grandfather, Prince Albert, by computing pioneer Charles Babbage.

Babbage had written the letter to Albert in the year 1843 about his 'Analytical Engine' which was a machine which had the capability to perform calculations using punch cards. The machine also featured a memory unit which was used to store numbers. While she stood at the Science Museum's new Smith Centre, people applauded as the Queen shared the post on social media. 

The first Instagram post by Britain's Queen Elizabeth II is displayed alongside a letter to Prince Albert from the Royal Archives, written in 1843, during her visit to the Science Museum on March 07, 2019 in London, England. (Photo by Simon Dawson/WPA Pool/Getty Images)
The first Instagram post by Britain's Queen Elizabeth II is displayed alongside a letter to Prince Albert from the Royal Archives, written in 1843, during her visit to the Science Museum on March 07, 2019 in London, England. (Photo by Simon Dawson/WPA Pool/Getty Images)