New 'victims' of Michael Jackson claim the singer's body could be exhumed for DNA tests

11 new victims of the 'King of Pop' have reportedly come forward to demand the singer's body be dug up so they can test it for DNA evidence that can prove he molested children


                            New 'victims' of Michael Jackson claim the singer's body could be exhumed for DNA tests

With the impending release of Dan Reed's 'Leaving Neverland' next month, which will chronicle the sexual abuse Wade Robson and Jimmy Safechuck faced at the hands of Michael Jackson, 'The King of Pop' finds himself in the spotlight for all the wrong reasons once again. In what is set to rattle cages at Jackon's estate further, bombshell reports suggest "an army of shell-shocked victims" are calling for his body to be exhumed so it can be proved conclusively that he was a serial child molester.

According to Radar Online, at least 11 new victims who claim they were molested and raped by the singer when they were between the ages of seven and 14 have come forward to demand his body be examined for traces of their DNA left on him after his attacks. The site also claims that this list of victims is "growing".

Victims have reportedly asked that Jackson's body be exhumed for DNA tests (Source: Doug Benc/Getty Images)
Victims have reportedly asked that Jackson's body be exhumed for DNA tests (Source: Doug Benc/Getty Images)

Speaking about Jackson's indiscretions, one source said the 'Smooth Criminal' star had abused dozens of children who were taken to his Neverland ranch, and that these included "kids in wheelchairs and children suffering from terminal diseases as young as seven."

The source called the singer's mansion "a pedophile's paradise masquerading as a theme park." The source claimed that Jackson had started abusing children from when he was a teenager and that because his offenses dated back more than 30 years, there may be "thousands of victims".

The extent of the abuse is the reason why there are many now campaigning for his body to be once again exhumed, another source explained to the tabloid. "Many victims and those campaigning to uncover the truth believe the key to proving the extent of Jackson’s abuse lies in digging up his remains and scraping it for DNA," the source added.

Jackson's estate argued that the Santa Barbara Sheriff's Office had found nothing on the singer despite a "virtual jihad" (Source: Frazer Harrison/Getty Images) 
Jackson's estate argued that the Santa Barbara Sheriff's Office had found nothing on the singer despite a "virtual jihad" (Source: Frazer Harrison/Getty Images) 

But that was just one of the claims Radar Online made. The site said they had obtained "secret files" which prove the FBI covered up evidence Jackson was a sex trafficker because a "starstruck" official "did not pursue the allegations since Jackson was an honor to receive at the White House."

If the case had been pursued, they reported, the singer would have been prosecuted under the "White Slave Traffic Act" designed to stop "transporting adults or kids for prostitution, debauchery or any other immoral purpose."

In a scathing letter sent to The Blast, Jackson's estate rubbished claims that the singer's body was going to be exhumed, writing sarcastically that their representatives "were surprised no one told them about this unusual development."

Michael Jackson performs onstage during the 'HIStory' world tour concert at Ericsson Stadium on November 10, 1996, in Auckland, New Zealand. (Photo by Phil Walter/Getty Images)
Michael Jackson performs onstage during the 'HIStory' world tour concert at Ericsson Stadium on November 10, 1996, in Auckland, New Zealand. (Photo by Phil Walter/Getty Images)

They also argued that the Santa Barbara District Attorney's Office was never able to locate any new victims despite going on a "virtual jihad" against the pop star.

The letter goes on to state that "nothing in the article is true" and that it is "full of maliciously and provably false statements," ending with a pointed bit of advice that read, "It is not our usual practice to tell persons in other professions how to do their jobs, but we will make an exception here. May we suggest that you try something different in the future and talk to real, sane, and credible sources?"