Sexual assault hotline sees 42 percent increase in calls amid allegations against supreme court nominee Brett Kavanaugh

The Rape, Abuse & Incest National Network which manages the National Sexual Assault Hotline said calls reporting sexual harassment increased by '42 percent on Friday and Saturday'


                            Sexual assault hotline sees 42 percent increase in calls amid allegations against supreme court nominee Brett Kavanaugh

American's National Sexual Assault Hotline is reportedly noticing a significant increase in the number of callers reporting sexual assault amidst sexual misconduct allegations against President Trump's Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh, according to reports.

The Rape, Abuse & Incest National Network (RAINN), which manages the hotline in the country, while talking to CNN's Brian Stelter, said calls reporting sexual harassment increased by "42 percent on Friday and Saturday compared to an average Friday and Saturday.”



 

Reports state that the surge in the percentage of calls come as Kavanaugh stands accused of sexual assault by Dr Christine Blasey Ford. Ford has alleged that Kavanaugh sexually assaulted her at a party when they were teenagers. The White House and top Republican lawmakers have expressed skepticism over Ford's allegations and some, including President Donald Trump, have even attacked her. 

Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh arrives for testimony before the Senate Judiciary Committee during his Supreme Court confirmation hearing in the Hart Senate Office Building on Capitol Hill September 4, 2018 in Washington, DC. Kavanaugh was nominated by President Donald Trump to fill the vacancy on the court left by retiring Associate Justice Anthony Kennedy.
Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh arrives for testimony before the Senate Judiciary Committee during his Supreme Court confirmation hearing in the Hart Senate Office Building on Capitol Hill September 4, 2018 in Washington, DC. Kavanaugh was nominated by President Donald Trump to fill the vacancy on the court left by retiring Associate Justice Anthony Kennedy.

 

Trump took to Twitter on Friday to ask Ford why police hadn't "immediately" been called if the assault had been "as bad as she says." The president's tweet triggered a barrage of responses as survivors of sexual assault came forward with their own stories explaining why it took them a lot of time to report the assault. By Friday evening hashtag #WhyIDidntReport became viral on social media.

Even RAINN joined in and responded to the president with figures of sexual assault victims who do not report to police, saying: "In reality, seven out of every 10 victims don't report to the police."



 

Another victim, identitied as Deborah Ramirez, also came forward on Sunday to accuse Kavanaugh of sexual misconduct during their time in Yale. 

Reports state that the National Sexual Assault Hotline had seen a similar surge in calls shortly after Trump's sexual assault remarks had made headlines in 2016, days before the presidential elections. 

Ahead of Kavanaugh's Senate hearing, women's rights organizations have also urged people to participate in a national walkout on Monday in an effort to suppport the Supreme Court nominee's victims. 

Abortion rights advocacy group NARAL wrote on Twitter: "We believe Dr. Christine Blasey Ford. We believe Deborah Ramirez." The anti-sexual harassement organization Time's Up tweeted: "Survivors must be heard," while urging people to participate in the walkout protest.