Naomi Judd killed herself in Nashville home that she once told Oprah was her 'haven and sanctuary'

Naomi had highlighted some of her favorite spaces in the farmhouse during the 2016 home tour, while referring to her home as her 'haven' and 'sanctuary'


                            Naomi Judd killed herself in Nashville home that she once told Oprah was her 'haven and sanctuary'
Naomi Judd attends her induction into the Kentucky Legends Hall of Fame on October 12, 2013 (Photo by Stephen Cohen/Getty Images)

WARNING: This article contains information about suicide and suicide ideation that some people may find triggering or upsetting. Discretion is advised.

Country music legend Naomi Judd died on April 30 at 75 from a self-inflicted gunshot wound at her 1,000-acre Nashville farmhouse. It was the same farmhouse that she proudly displayed in an interview with Oprah Winfrey. Appearing on 'Oprah: Where Are They Now?' show, Naomi had highlighted some of her favorite spaces in the house during the 2016 home tour, while referring to her home as her 'haven' and 'sanctuary,' adding that she 'called it Peaceful Valley the moment I laid eyes on it.' Naomi also showed off her kitchen and dining room, both of which appeared to be very cherished spaces in her life at the time. 

While showing her kitchen Naomi remarked that “I do all my own cooking,” while revealing that, “Ashley wants the beef stroganoff [when she comes over and] Wynonna wants chicken continental. A circular dining table was also a must-have since she wanted to create an environment conducive to conversation and engaging debate, Naomi added. She added, “The kitchen table, you'll notice that it's round because I'm very democratic. We want to be able to face each other.” 

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According to the Daily Mail, for over three decades, the Country Music Hall of Famer held the Nashville-area property. Naomi's daughters Ashley Judd and Wynonna Judd both owned homes on the property. During the interview, Naomi said while pointing at her daughter's home, “Ashley lives right up over that hill, right up the road. And Miss Wynonna lives right over that hill” adding that it took her precisely one minute to go from her house to Ashley's front door and takes approximately six minutes to her eldest daughter's place. 



 


However, the whole interview only covered the ground floor of her home and the top level was not shown, with the exception of her deck. Earlier, Naomi’s daughter, Ashley Judd revealed in an interview with ‘Good Morning America’ that the Grammy-winning country musician died last month after shooting herself in a room upstairs in the same Nashville farmhouse. Ashley claimed she went to Naomi's house every day, including the day she died last month. She said, “It was a mixed day. I visit with my mom and pop every day when I’m in Tennessee. … Mom said to me, ‘Will you stay with me?’ and I said ‘Of course, I will.'”

Actress Ashley Judd (L-R), and singers Naomi and Wynonna Judd arrive at the "YouthAIDS Annual Benefit Gala 2003" at Capitale on October 27, 2003, in New York City. (Photo by Evan Agostini/Getty Images For YouthAIDS)

After some time, someone came to the house, according to Ashley, and she went upstairs to inform Naomi that someone was waiting for her. “I went upstairs to let her know the friend was there, and I discovered her. I have both grief and trauma from discovering her. My mother is entitled to her dignity and her privacy. And so there are some things that we would just like to retain as a family,” she explained. 

(L-R) Inductees Wynonna Judd and Ashley Judd speak onstage for the class of 2021 medallion ceremony at the Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum on May 01, 2022, in Nashville, Tennessee. (Photo by Terry Wyatt/Getty Images)

Naomi Judd died just days before she and her daughter Wynonna were to be inducted into the 'Country Music Hall of Fame' as 'The Judds.' Ashley explained, “When we’re talking about mental illness, it’s very important to make the distinction between our loved one and the disease. It lies. It’s savage. Our mother couldn’t hang on until she was inducted into the Hall of Fame by her peers. That was the level of catastrophe that was going on inside … the regard they had for her couldn’t penetrate her heart.” 

If you or someone you know is considering suicide, please contact the National Suicide Hotline at 1-800-273-TALK (8255).

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