71% Republicans want Trump back in White House in 2024 even as 50% Americans say he failed as president: Poll

According to a USA Today/Suffolk University Poll, 71 percent of GOP voters have said they would support Trump if he becomes the Republican presidential nominee in 2024


                            71% Republicans want Trump back in White House in 2024 even as 50% Americans say he failed as president: Poll
(Getty Images)

Nearly three-quarters of Republicans are ready to vote for President Donald Trump back into the White House in 2024 - despite half of Americans reportedly believing he "failed" as commander-in-chief, a new poll shows. According to a USA Today/Suffolk University Poll released Thursday, 71 percent of GOP voters have said they would support Trump if he becomes the Republican presidential nominee in 2024. Meanwhile, 16 percent of Republicans have said they would consider supporting the president, and 10 percent said they would not. While Americans, in general, may disagree with Trump, the aforementioned figures suggest that Trump is the de-facto leader of the GOP and enjoys a stronghold of the party like no losing presidential candidate in modern history.

According to the poll, however, 50 percent of those surveyed said Trump had failed as a president. Among the rest, "16 percent said he would be judged as a fair president, 16 percent said a great president, 13 percent said a good president, and 5 percent were undecided," The Sun reported.

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump gives two thumbs up to the crowd during the evening session on the fourth day of the Republican National Convention on July 21, 2016 at the Quicken Loans Arena in Cleveland, Ohio. (Getty Images)

In the same poll, Trump scored considerably lesser than Barack Obama after his second term. At the time, the poll found that only 23 percent of Americans considered Obama as failed president, while 50 percent said he would be viewed positively, 32 percent called him a good president, and 18 percent called him a great president.

Meanwhile, when it came to the disputed 2020 election results, the poll found that 62 percent of Americans believe Democrat Joe Biden was legitimately elected president, while 37 percent did not think he was. The group, which comprised of more than one third of Americans who didn't believe was Biden won fair and square, reportedly included 78 percent of Republicans. However, 96 percent of Democrats think that Biden was legitimately elected, according to the poll. Most Republicans have made it clear that they do not believe Biden won the election. In November, an Economist/YouGov survey found that 88 percent of Americans who voted for Trump thought that Biden did not legitimately win the race to the White House. Meanwhile, 79 percent of Trump supporters in the same poll said the President should not concede to Biden. In contrast, only 57 percent of Republicans in the USA Today/Suffolk University poll said Trump should concede. 

It's worth noting that the latest poll surveyed 1,000 registered voters from December 16 to 20, and reported a margin of error of plus or minus 3.1 percentage points.

President-elect Donald Trump (L) talks after a meeting with U.S. President Barack Obama (R) in the Oval Office November 10, 2016 in Washington, DC. (Getty Images)

In August, a Rasmussen poll showed that a majority of voters felt Biden will not complete even one term in the Oval Office.

The poll, conducted by telephone and online surveys, found that 59 percent of US voters believed it was "likely" that Biden's VP pick Kamala Harris will be president before Biden completes his term, with 39 percent saying it was "very likely." While this view was shared mostly by Republicans (73 percent) and voters not affiliated with either Republicans or Democrats (57 percent), it also included a significant proportion of Democrats as well (49 percent), indicating that the faith in Biden wasn't widespread.

The poll also showed that Democrats (59 percent) attached more importance to Biden's pick of a running mate than Republicans (32 percent) and unaffiliated voters (43 percent). Furthermore, 38 percent of voters, including 20% of Democrats, believed the 78-year-old is suffering from some form of dementia.
 
 

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