LAW & ORDER: Ministers push for misogyny to be made a 'hate crime', and two-year jail sentence for 'upskirting'

Latest reports state that the Labour MP Stella Creasy is attemptin to add new rules associated with hatred of women to the new anti-voyeurism laws.


                            LAW & ORDER: Ministers push for misogyny to be made a 'hate crime', and two-year jail sentence for 'upskirting'

The United Kingdom (UK) Members of Parliament are set to vote for new laws banning upskirting and misogyny could be considered as a hate crime under the legislation, according to reports. The legislation's current draft has Prime Minister Theresa May's backing.

The bill, which is called the Voyeurism (Offences) Bill will reportedly allow a judge to imprison upskirting offenders to a term of up to two years, according to the Daily Mail. Latest reports state that the Labour MP Stella Creasy is attempting to add new rules associated with hatred of women to the new anti-voyeurism laws.

The MP's plan to re-write the legislation to incorporate misogyny is set to be debated and voted on in the House of Commons on Wednesday. According to Creasy's amendment, her proposal will "ensure that if the crime is motivated by misogyny, then that will be considered by a court as an aggravating factor when considering the seriousness of the crime for the purposes of sentencing."

 

Stella Creasy posted about her initiative on Instagram
Stella Creasy posted about her initiative on Instagram

 

The proposed law will allow the sentencing judge to consider if the offender "demonstrated towards the victim of the offense hostility based on the victim having (or being presumed to have) a particular sex characteristic."

Creasy, in a statement, said that the MPs who are voting on the legislation had "a chance to help make sure everyone is free to walk our streets without fear of harassment."

The politician took to Twitter on Tuesday to write: "Ask your MP to back amendment 7 to the voyeurism bill to treat misogynistic behavior as hate crime."

 

Prime Minister Theresa May has also showed her support to the draf of the anti-voyeurism bill. (Getty Images)
Prime Minister Theresa May has also showed her support to the draf of the anti-voyeurism bill. (Getty Images)

A spokesperson for the Ministry of Justice, while talking about Creasy's amendment, said: "We already have robust legislation that can be used to protect women from a range of crimes. We are determined to see the upskirting bill passed as soon as possible, to better protect victims and bring offenders to justice."

Reports state that the amendment has a support of several MPs, including Conservative former women and equalities minister Nicky Morgan.  There could, however, be further delays in the approval of the Bill if the amendment proves to be controversial.

The Bill already suffered a setback when Conservative MP Christopher Chope blocked it an earlier stage in the Commons. The move had garnered heavy criticism.