Minnesota teacher allegedly calls for assassination of Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh

The special education teacher from Minnesota has been put on paid administrative leave after she allegedly tweeted that someone should assassinate Supreme Court Justice Kavanaugh


                            Minnesota teacher allegedly calls for assassination of Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh

A teacher from Minnesota has reportedly been put on paid administrative leave after she allegedly tweeted that someone should assassinate Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh, according to reports.

The special education teacher from Rosemount, however, has deleted her Twitter account after her tweet went viral. Her activity on the popular micro-blogging site, however, was reported by Twitter users to the FBI and Secret Service. She allegedly wrote in her tweet: "So whose gonna take one for the team and kill Kavanaugh [sic]." FBI, in a statement to The Star Tribune, said that it was aware of the tweet.



 

Intermediate School District 917 Superintendent Mark Zuzek on Monday confirmed that the district disclosed a complaint against the teacher over the weekend and now she has been put on paid administrative leave pending an investigation, according to the Associated Press.

The Tribune reportedly said that it had not named the teacher because she has not been officially charged with a crime.

Judge Brett Kavanaugh testifies to the Senate Judiciary Committee during his Supreme Court confirmation hearing in the Dirksen Senate Office Building on Capitol Hill September 27, 2018 in Washington, DC. Kavanaugh was called back to testify about claims by Christine Blasey Ford, who has accused him of sexually assaulting her during a party in 1982 when they were high school students in suburban Maryland.
Judge Brett Kavanaugh testifies to the Senate Judiciary Committee during his Supreme Court confirmation hearing in the Dirksen Senate Office Building on Capitol Hill September 27, 2018 in Washington, DC. Kavanaugh was called back to testify about claims by Christine Blasey Ford, who has accused him of sexually assaulting her during a party in 1982 when they were high school students in suburban Maryland.

There has been a lot of controversy surrounding Justice Kavanaugh's confirmation to the Supreme Court, particularly regarding the sexual assault allegations him. Kavanaugh was confirmed after a tumultuous week in the Senate where the Senate Judiciary Committee heard the allegations against him from Dr. Christine Blasey Ford, who came out with the claim in public and testified against Kavanaugh alleging that he sexually assaulted her during a high school party in the 1980s. 

Ford's testimony, which was painful to watch for many, was widely seen as credible as she asked for an FBI investigation into her claims and stood in stark contrast to Kavanaugh's, who not even once conceded to an FBI investigation, repeatedly suggesting that the Senate hearing was enough. The judge has also been accused of sexual misconduct by two other women — Deborah Ramirez and Julie Swetnick. Kavanaugh, however, has denied all the allegations.

Christine Blasey Ford testifies before the U.S. Senate Judiciary Committee at the Dirksen Senate Office Building on Capitol Hill September 27, 2018 in Washington, DC. Blasey Ford, a professor at Palo Alto University and a research psychologist at the Stanford University School of Medicine, has accused Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaughof sexually assaulting her during a party in 1982 when they were high school students in suburban Maryland.
Christine Blasey Ford testifies before the U.S. Senate Judiciary Committee at the Dirksen Senate Office Building on Capitol Hill September 27, 2018 in Washington, DC. Blasey Ford, a professor at Palo Alto University and a research psychologist at the Stanford University School of Medicine, has accused Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaughof sexually assaulting her during a party in 1982 when they were high school students in suburban Maryland.

The Senate Judiciary Committee subsequently agreed on an FBI investigation into the allegations after Republican Senator Jeff Flake said that he would withdraw his vote if the investigation is not conducted. 

The FBI probe, however, did not corroborate Ford's sexual assault allegations and Kavanaugh was sworn in on Monday as a Supreme Court Justice, resulting in countrywide protests.