Michelle Obama's mother Marian was 'most beloved' figure and did her own laundry in The White House

In Marian's first-ever televised interview, it was revealed that she had a 'stream' of staff members regularly paying her visits, often to ask the mother-figure for advice


                            Michelle Obama's mother Marian was 'most beloved' figure and did her own laundry in The White House

Michelle Obama has a mother who seems to get sweeter by the day. In a new report, the former First Lady disclosed how her mother Marian used to do her own laundry even inside the White House. And what's more: she even made her two granddaughters share household chores, giving them "laundry lessons" from time to time.

According to Michelle, even though she and her husband were among the most popular people in the country,  it was her mother, Marian Shield Robinson, who was the most 'beloved figure' in the household, especially when it came to matters behind the scenes.

President Barack Obama walks with First Lady Michelle Obama (L) and his mother-in-law Marian Robinson from Marine One to the Residence of the White House October 9, 2011, in Washington, DC. (Getty Images)
President Barack Obama walks with First Lady Michelle Obama (L) and his mother-in-law Marian Robinson from Marine One to the Residence of the White House October 9, 2011, in Washington, DC. (Getty Images)

The 54-year-old spoke at length about her mother's revered status in the White House when Barack was President, during a candid discussion with CBS's Gayle King. It was also Marian's first-ever televised interview, where she revealed that she took care of her own laundry needs all through the eight years that she resided in the White House.

"It was a huge adjustment," Marian said of life at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue. "As a matter of fact, I had talked [the White House staff] into allowing me to do my own laundry." But that's not all. "She taught the girls how to do their laundry," Michelle revealed. "They would go upstairs for laundry lessons. They learned how to use the machine."

First Lady Michelle Obama arrives with daughters Malia Obama (C) and Sasha Obama (L) and her mother Marian Robinson (behind Malia) at Malpensa Airport on June 17, 2015, in Milan, Italy. (Getty Images)
First Lady Michelle Obama arrives with daughters Malia Obama (C) and Sasha Obama (L) and her mother Marian Robinson (behind Malia) at Malpensa Airport on June 17, 2015, in Milan, Italy. (Getty Images)

Marian revealed that it was her granddaughters' well-being which initially made her move into the White House after her son-in-law became the POTUS. Michelle's mother claimed that by her moving into the house, she could ensure some decent level of normalcy in the life of the two young girls, who were merely seven and 10 at the time.

"I felt like this was going to be a very hard life for both of them," Marian told Gayle of her granddaughters.
"[I] was worried about their safety," she added. "I was worried about my grandkids." Michelle added to her mother's explanation by saying, "I wanted them to come home to family… there were just parts of the girls' lives that I just knew were going to be okay 'cause Mom was there. When I traveled internationally, grandma was there. When I wasn't home at the end of the day, grandma was there."

U.S. President Barack Obama, daughters Malia Obama and Sasha Obama, First Lady Michelle Obama and Marian Robinson (R) attend a men's NCCA basketball game between the University of Maryland and Oregon State University, November 17, 2013, at Comcast Center in College Park, Maryland. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
U.S. President Barack Obama, daughters Malia Obama and Sasha Obama, First Lady Michelle Obama and Marian Robinson (R) attend a men's NCCA basketball game between the University of Maryland and Oregon State University, November 17, 2013, at Comcast Center in College Park, Maryland. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

"When the kids were still little and they needed to have someone be with them in school. I mean, you think about my girls were being driven around in a motorcade of three cars with at least four grown adults with guns in each of those cars. And I just thought that that's an unnatural way for a little 2nd grader to go to school. Well, Mom would ride in the car with her to make it feel like a regular carpool."

However, Marian's immediate family was not the only one that was benefitting from her stay in the White House at the time. Marian, who quickly became the 'most beloved' figure in the house, had a "stream" of staff members regularly paying her visits, often in order to ask the mother-figure for advice.

First Lady Michelle Obama (L) and Marian Robinson (R) watch a women's college basketball game between the Princeton Tigers and the American University Eagles at Bender Arena on November 23, 2014. in Washington, DC. (Getty Images)
First Lady Michelle Obama (L) and Marian Robinson (R) watch a women's college basketball game between the Princeton Tigers and the American University Eagles at Bender Arena on November 23, 2014. in Washington, DC. (Getty Images)

"She had a stream of people. The butlers, the housekeepers. They would all stop by... Grandma's room was like the confessional," Michelle recalled. "You know, everyone would go there and just unload, you know? And then they'd leave."

When both the ladies were asked if they miss their life in the White House, they both responded with the same thing: not one bit. "The eight years was more than enough," said Michelle. "And what I realized over the years is that home is where we are, you know? And the White House happened to be our home for eight years. But we took all that love and energy, and we just moved it to another house."

Marian Robinson, Sasha Obama, First Lady Michelle Obama and U.S. President Barack Obama exit Marine One and walk toward the residence of the White House, on June 6, 2015, in Washington, DC. (Getty Images)
Marian Robinson, Sasha Obama, First Lady Michelle Obama and U.S. President Barack Obama exit Marine One and walk toward the residence of the White House, on June 6, 2015, in Washington, DC. (Getty Images)

Michelle also spoke about what her two daughters had to go through in their lives when all of a sudden, their father was declared as America's next president. She admitted that it was difficult to see her girls having to live their lives in the public eye, even when they were not asking for any kind of attention. "You want your kids to grow up normal," she said. "You want them to be able to have the wonderful experiences privately. And you want them to be able to fail and stumble privately. Like any other kids."

"You know, it's an odd thing for the world to see you transition from a child to a young woman. And so they've grown up. And they've had their stumbles, and they've had their triumphs."

President Barack Obama takes a walk down the street from his home accompanied by his mother-in-law Marian Robinson, daughter Malia Obama, First Lady Michelle Obama Obama and dog Bo May 29, 2010, in Chicago, Illinois. (Getty Images)
President Barack Obama takes a walk down the street from his home accompanied by his mother-in-law Marian Robinson, daughter Malia Obama, First Lady Michelle Obama Obama and dog Bo May 29, 2010, in Chicago, Illinois. (Getty Images)