Five times Michael Moore shocked the world with his cinematic work

Michael Moore - the King of Documentaries - is known for his cinematic work on globalization, capitalism and assault weapon ownership in the country.


                            Five times Michael Moore shocked the world with his cinematic work

The Academy Award-winning filmmaker and best-selling author Michael Moore is back in action with his latest politically charged documentary on President Donald Trump titled 'Fahrenheit 11/9'. The documentary, a spiritual sequel to Moore's box-office-busting 2004 documentary 'Fahrenheit 9/11,' is set to be released on Friday as the filmmaker predicts that Trump could be the last president of the United States with the way things are going in America.

 

Poster of Fahrenheit 11/9
Poster of Fahrenheit 11/9

Moore, famous for his political activism, is also known for his work on globalization, capitalism and assault weapon ownership in the US. He is considered the King of Documentary Box Office by many with a lot of his films turning out to be highest-grossing documentaries. The filmmaker's 'Fahrenheit 9/11,' released 14 years ago, became the highest-grossing documentary at the American box office of all time and also won a Palme d'Or.

Moore's hard-hitting documentaries are considered groundbreaking as he highlights the stark social and political issues in the country and mocks the leadership for their inaction, including Presiden Donald Trump and former Presidents George Bush and Bill Clinton. 

Here's a look at his major cinematic works which shocked the viewers and made them rethink the state of the nation:

1. 'Fahrenheit 9/11'

This one is Moore's most intellectually stimulating documentary to date. The film produced divisive responses worldwide about the controversial arguments presented by him on the George W. Bush administration and the way it handled the Iraq war.

The two-hour-long film is a searing critique of Bush's first term in office and highlights how the Iraq war was illegal. The film presents intelligent arguments on how Bush, who had affiliations with dictators across the globe, launched a devastating war in Iraq for its oil.

Poster for Fahrenheit 9/11
Poster for Fahrenheit 9/11

 

Moore during one unnerving moment in the film confronts a legislator, asking them who read the Patriot Act before Congress signed on it unanimously. To this, the legislator responds: "We don't read most of the bills that pass through." Moore's Palme d’Or winning film is considered the prime cinematic work which brought the exposé of America's invasion of the middle-east as largely due to corporate interests to the knowledge of its viewers.

2. 'Bowling for Columbine'

The 2002 film, 'Bowling for Columbine,' is considered one of the greatest documentaries of all time and rightly so, as the film is highly relevant in America even after 16 years after its release. The documentary, which is centered around the 1999 Columbine High School shooting, questions America's disturbing gun culture and the country's penchant for firearms.

Moore, in this film, explores the circumstances which led up to the Columbine school massacre and mocks, with his signature angry humor,  the easy -availability of firearms through a case study of a bank that hands their customer a free rifle when they open a bank account with them.

Poster of Bowling for Columbine
Poster of Bowling for Columbine

 

Moore also tackles the subject of an ever-increasing number of gun owners and homicide rate in the country and investigates why Canada does not have the same excessive rate of gun violence. The filmmaker suggests that a culture of fear created by the government and media in America leads to widespread gun-ownership in the country, much to the advantage of gun corporations and organizations like the National Rifle Association (NRA).

The documentary assisted in providing an explanation to non-Americans perplexed with America's obsession with guns, which is reflected in the massive international recognition and awards this documentary received.

3. 'Sicko'

Moore's documentary 'Sicko,' which dissected America's profiteering health care system, surpassed 'Bowling for Columbine's $22 million US box office gross; standing at $25 million. The documentary highlights the hypocrisy of the country's privatized healthcare and projects the staggering number of uninsured Americans. He also refers to the World Health Organization, which ranked the United States — one of the richest countries in the world — 37 out of 191 nations on general health in 2007. 

Poster of Sicko
Poster of Sicko

 

The documentary shows the corruptive actions of health insurance companies, which includes refusal to treat patients, deadly oversights and a lack of compensation, all for the sake of profit as patients drown in debt. As the film proceeds, it provides a succinct comparison of America's corrupt health care system with the non-profit universal health care systems of Canada, the United Kingdom, France, and Japan to show that the US healthcare system does not work for the patients and instead caters to health insurance corporations.

4. 'Where to Invade Next'

Moore came up with 'Where to Invade Next' in 2015, after nearly six years of a sabbatical from the cinematic world, and within a week of its limited release in a Los Angeles and New York City theatre, it qualified for the Academy Awards. The documentary can be perceived as a list of instructions for America to learn and acquire sound and working policies from different countries across the globe.

Moore, as an "invader," visits a host of countries including Italy, France, Finland, Germany, Slovenia, Norway, Iceland, and Tunisia, to learn how the United States could improve its own prospects.

Poster of Where to Invade Next
Poster of Where to Invade Next

 

Moore covers a variety of failing  social and economic institutions in the US and experiences alternative methods to deal with the ills by highlighting worker benefits, school lunches, early education, college education, worker inclusion, decriminalized drugs, low recidivism, women's health care, and women's inclusion and leadership role in society in the countries he visits. 

5. 'Michael Moore in Trumpland'

'Michael Moore in Trumpland' was released a few weeks before the 2016 presidential elections and premiered just 11 days after it was shot. The project is more of a stand-up routine performed by Moore in the heart of a land full of supporters of Donald Trump, Wilmington Ohio, pitching for the Republican's opponent Hillary Clinton.

In the film, Moore cleverly critiques Trump's disdain of Muslims and immigrants as he orders a makeshift wall around the Mexican audience in the mix of Conservatives and Democrats at the Murphy Theatre. 

Poster of Michael Moore in Trumpland
Poster of Michael Moore in Trumpland

 

However, he also explains in the movie as to what circumstances led a significant number of voters in the country back Trump. These votes, he explains, are the ones neglected and abandonment of countless Americans by our economic and social order. The film, in all, provides an understanding of the political challenges during the 2016 elections.