Michael Jackson talked to child-sized mannequins kept in numerous bizarre poses at Neverland mansion

Dan Reed's documentary 'Leaving Neverland' focuses on Wade Robson and Jimmy Safechuck, the alleged child sex abuse victims of Michael Jackson, and is set to premiere next month


                            Michael Jackson talked to child-sized mannequins kept in numerous bizarre poses at Neverland mansion

'Leaving Neverland', the new documentary by Dan Reed focusing on Wade Robson and Jimmy Safechuck, the alleged child sex abuse victims of Michael Jackson, is set to premiere next month and has seen several unsavory rumors about the 'King of Pop' surface once again.

New reports claim the singer used to regularly converse with child-sized mannequins he kept at his Neverland mansion about how he "knew something was wrong" with him and how he used to cry while watching children play across the park when he was still a teenager.

Child-sized mannequins were discovered in Jackson's Neverland mansion after his death in 2009 (Source: Carlo Allegri/Getty Images)
Child-sized mannequins were discovered in Jackson's Neverland mansion after his death in 2009 (Source: Carlo Allegri/Getty Images)

According to The Sun, the mannequins were first discovered in Jackson's mansion after his drug overdose death in 2009 propped up in numerous bizarre poses. During conversations taped with Rabbi Shmuley Boteach shortly before his death, he confessed he used to pour out his heart to the dolls.

In 'The Michael Jackson Tapes: A Tragic Icon Reveals His Soul In Intimate Conversation', the singer revealed how he used to roam the streets as a child desperately looking for strangers to befriend because of the strict schedules enforced on him by his abusive father Joe Jackson.

Joe, who was a former boxer and steelworker for US Steel, used to regularly threaten Jackson and his three brothers who were part of 'The Jackson 5' with violence if they messed up during grueling rehearsal sessions that often spanned the entire length of the day.

Jackson's troubled relationship with his father is well-documented (Source: Vince Bucci/Getty Images)
Jackson's troubled relationship with his father is well-documented (Source: Vince Bucci/Getty Images)

The singer's troubled relationship with his father is well-documented with Jackson alleging Joe regularly whipped him as a boy and was verbally, physically, and emotionally abusive towards him during their incessant rehearsals. It's something he detailed in his New York Times bestselling autobiography 'Moonwalk' as well.

Speaking about the effects of his strict regime to the Rabbi, Jackson said, "I was looking for people to talk to. I was so lonely I would cry in my room upstairs. I would think, 'That's it. I am getting out of here,' and I would walk down the street."

"I remember really saying to people, 'Will you be my friend?'" he continued. "They were like, 'Michael Jackson!' I would go, 'Oh, God! Are they going to be my friend because of Michael Jackson or because of me?' I just wanted someone to talk to."

Jackson said he never felt like a real teenager because of his fame and unrelenting recording schedule (Photo by Express Newspapers/Getty Images)
Jackson said he never felt like a real teenager because of his fame and unrelenting recording schedule (Photo by Express Newspapers/Getty Images)

Jackson also goes on to divulge how he never felt like a real teenager because of his fame and unrelenting recording schedule. He said he would see the park right across the street and children playing football and baseball, and was yearning to join them but couldn't because he had to stay in to sing for the albums.

"I sat there looking at the kids with tears running down my face and I would say, 'I am trapped and I have to do this for the rest of my life. I am under contract,'" he said. "But I wanted to go over there so bad, it was killing me, just to [meet] a friend to say, 'Hi.'"

He explained this difficult childhood was the reason he had the seemingly odd child-sized mannequins at his home. "I needed someone... That’s probably why I had the mannequins," he told the Rabbi. "I would say because I felt I needed people, someone, I didn't have... I was too shy to be around real people. I didn't talk to them."

"It wasn't like old ladies talking to plants. But I always thought I wanted something to make me feel like I had company."