Michael Jackson's sister LaToya had denounced his "crimes against small, innocent children" in shocking 1993 interview

The interview was given to MTV in 1993, but LaToya later retracted her accusation and said her then husband had instigated her


                            Michael Jackson's sister LaToya had denounced his "crimes against small, innocent children" in shocking 1993 interview

Amid rekindled allegations of sexual abuse of children against late musician Michael Jackson, a shocking 1993 MTV interview of his sister LaToya is making waves wherein she condemns her brother's "crimes against small, innocent children."

According to LaToya, 62, she had seen quite a few youngsters receive hush money cheques for "very, very large sums," Daily Mail reports.

The interview was aired after the King of Pop was accused of molesting Jordy Chandler, 13, following which there was a settlement.



 

In the unearthed footage from 1993, LaToya told MTV: "Michael is my brother, I love him a great deal but I cannot, and will not, be a silent collaborator of his crimes against small, innocent children. If I remain silent then it means I fuel the guilt and humiliation these children are feeling and I think it's very wrong."

LaToya's comments resurfaced just days after HBO's 'Leaving Neverland' was aired for the first time on television this week. While there had been several rumors of child abuse throughout the legendary singer's life, none of the accusations were ever substantiated.

"Now you stop and think for one second and you tell me, what 35-year-old man is going to take a little boy and stay with him for 30 days?" she said.

"And take another boy and stay with him for five days in a room and never leave the room? How many of you out there are 35 years old? How many would take little kids and do that? That are nine, 10, 11 years old? I love my brother but it's wrong. I don't want to see these kids hurt."

La Toya Jackson attends the screening of 'Burning' during the 71st annual Cannes Film Festival at Palais des Festivals on May 16, 2018, in Cannes, France. (Getty)
La Toya Jackson attends the screening of 'Burning' during the 71st annual Cannes Film Festival at Palais des Festivals on May 16, 2018, in Cannes, France. (Getty)

"I am a victim myself and I know what it feels like," LaToya continued. "These kids are going to be scarred for the rest of their lives and I don't want to see any more innocent, small children being affected this way. I love Michael very dearly but I feel even more sorry for these children because they don't have a life anymore, they don't."

She claimed in the interview that she was abused by her father. According to reports, LaToya was estranged from the Jackson family at the time of the interview and was accused of slandering her brother to make money. She also retracted her claims later, saying her then husband had convinced her to denounce her brother.



 

Nonetheless, the two-part documentary has ensured these allegations continue even a decade after the 'Billie Jean' hitmaker's death.

In the film, which premiered at the Sundance Film Festival this year, the details of abuse by two alleged victims — Wade Robson and James Safechuck — was so disturbing that some traumatized viewers sought help from counselors.

That said, HBO is currently facing a $100 million lawsuit from Jackson's estate, which has denied any wrongdoing on his part. The lawsuit claims the network was violating a "non-disparagement" agreement by airing the film.

"Ten years after his passing, there are still those out to profit from his enormous worldwide success and take advantage of his eccentricities," the suit claims.