Michael Jackson accuser Safechuck is lying because 'sex abuse room' wasn’t even built when he was allegedly raped, says biographer

Mike Smallcombe pointed out discrepancies in the stories of Wade Robson and James Safechuck, calling their credibility into question.


                            Michael Jackson accuser Safechuck is lying because 'sex abuse room' wasn’t even built when he was allegedly raped, says biographer

A Michael Jackson biographer has called out James Safechuck for the explosive child abuse claims he made against the singer in Dan Reed's 'Leaving Neverland' and pointed out how the allegations are easily disprovable.

Speaking to The Mirror, Mike Smallcombe questioned Safechuck's claims that he had been molested by Jackson in an upstairs room in Neverland's train station, pointing out how it had not been built until two years after he said the sexual abuse stopped.



 

Smallcombe highlighted that Safechuck had stated in his lawsuit against Jackson's estate that the abuse occurred from 1988 until 1992, when he was 14, but that the construction on the train station did not start until the latter part of 1993 — tweeting a Santa Barbara County construction permit which showed the approval date as September 2, 1993. He also said that the station did not open until the start of 1994 when Safechuck was 16. 

"So abuse in the train station wasn’t possible if the abuse stopped in 1992, as he claims in his testimony, as it didn't even exist then," Smallcombe argued. "There's a two-year difference."

Furthermore, Jackson was reportedly touring and at a rehab center in London while the station was being built, and then, for the initial months after it opened, living in Trump Tower in New York recording the HIStory album. "By the time Jackson was at Neverland and the train station was actually open, it was early 1995, three years after Safechuck said the abuse stopped," Smallcombe said. "And by then Safechuck was 17, and on the cusp of adulthood."



 

Smallcombe's allegation that Safechuck lied prompted a response from the director of 'Leaving Neverland' documentary, who tweeted, "Yeah there seems to be no doubt about the station date. The date they have wrong is the end of the abuse."

The biographer previously said he could disprove the claims made by Wade Robson, the other accuser in 'Leaving Neverland,' as well. He said the 1993 testimony of Robson's mother, Joy, shows that at least some of the allegations made by Robson in the documentary are false. Robson had said that Jackson started abusing him when his family went to the Grand Canyon while he stayed behind with the singer, a claim Smallcombe says is contradicted by Joy's own words.

Smallcombe also said he could disprove Robson's claims (Source: Connie Aramaki/Getty Images)
Smallcombe also said he could disprove Robson's claims (Source: Connie Aramaki/Getty Images)

"In the documentary, Wade Robson described how he and his then 10-year-old sister stayed in Jackson’s bedroom the first two nights they were ever at Neverland in January 1990," he said. "Wade then claimed that his family left to go to the Grand Canyon, while he stayed behind with Jackson alone at Neverland for the next five days. Wade claimed it was then when he was first abused by Jackson, going into graphic detail about what had allegedly happened over the course of several nights."

But Smallcombe pointed out how Joy testified under oath in a deposition in 1993/1994 in connection to the Jordan Chandler case that Wade had gone on that trip with the family to the Grand Canyon. "Joy Robson had no reason to lie about this; she openly admitted that Wade stayed with Jackson alone on other occasions," he said.

"When giving evidence and asked if his sister had stayed in the bed with him 'the entire time' they were at Neverland on that first trip, Wade answered 'yes.'," he continued. "Meaning he never stayed alone with Jackson during that trip."

The biographer alleges that Wade had even admitted he had to rely on his mum to understand about what happened when he was a child because he couldn't' remember it all. Smallcombe adds: "That was when Wade was drafting a book about the alleged abuse, having failed to get the Cirque du Soleil job with the Estate.

"All of this shows that Wade's story about being abused that first time, while the rest of his family had supposedly left the ranch to go to the Grand Canyon, is false.

"Of course, while this doesn't categorically rule out that Jackson abused Wade Robson, it does make you wonder if this extremely detailed and key story in the documentary has been fabricated."