Melania Trump on #MeToo: Women "need to have really hard evidence" to accuse men of sexual misconduct

Her statement came after the confirmation of Brett Kavanaugh as Supreme Court Justice earlier this week despite multiple sexual assault allegations against him.


                            Melania Trump on #MeToo: Women "need to have really hard evidence" to accuse men of sexual misconduct

First Lady Melania Trump recently gave her perspective on the #MeToo movement in her first televised interview. She, however, appeared to echo her husband President Donald Trump's comments, suggesting that "really hard evidence" is required from sexual assault victims if they want to accuse their perpetrators.

U.S. President Donald Trump (L) and first lady Melania Trump return to the White House after a day trip to Cincinnati, Ohio, February 5, 2018 in Washington, DC. While in Ohio President Trump delivered remarks after touring cylinder manufacturer Sheffer Corporation while the first lady visited patients and their families at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center.
U.S. President Donald Trump (L) and first lady Melania Trump return to the White House after a day trip to Cincinnati, Ohio, February 5, 2018 in Washington, DC. While in Ohio President Trump delivered remarks after touring cylinder manufacturer Sheffer Corporation while the first lady visited patients and their families at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center.

Trump, while speaking to ABC's Good Morning America, said: "You need to have really hard evidence, that if you accuse of something, show the evidence." Her statement came after the confirmation of Brett Kavanaugh as Supreme Court Justice earlier this week despite multiple sexual assault allegations against him, similar to her husband.

The first lady said: "I do stand with women, but we need to show the evidence. You cannot just say to somebody, 'I was sexually assaulted,' or 'You did that to me,' cause sometimes the media goes too far, and the way they portray some stories, it's not correct. It's not right."



 

Melania Trump's statement appeared to resemble the ones issued by President Tump, who during an FBI investigation into the sexual assault claims against Kavanaugh, said that he was worried of men being falsely accused.

Judge Brett Kavanaugh testifies to the Senate Judiciary Committee during his Supreme Court confirmation hearing in the Dirksen Senate Office Building on Capitol Hill September 27, 2018 in Washington, DC. Kavanaugh was called back to testify about claims by Christine Blasey Ford, who has accused him of sexually assaulting her during a party in 1982 when they were high school students in suburban Maryland.
Judge Brett Kavanaugh testifies to the Senate Judiciary Committee during his Supreme Court confirmation hearing in the Dirksen Senate Office Building on Capitol Hill September 27, 2018 in Washington, DC. Kavanaugh was called back to testify about claims by Christine Blasey Ford, who has accused him of sexually assaulting her during a party in 1982 when they were high school students in suburban Maryland.

"It is a very scary time for young men in America, where you can be guilty of something you may not be guilty of. This is a very, very—this is a very difficult time. What's happening here has much more to do than even the appointment of a Supreme Court justice," Trump told reporters.

Trump also addressed the multiple sexual assault accusations against him and said: "I've had many false accusations." He made the statement while defending Kavanaugh.

 

The president also publicly mocked Kavanaugh's accuser Dr. Christine Blasey Ford during  a rally, imitating her testimony which she gave in front of the Senate Judiciary Committee.

Christine Blasey Ford testifies before the U.S. Senate Judiciary Committee at the Dirksen Senate Office Building on Capitol Hill September 27, 2018 in Washington, DC. Blasey Ford, a professor at Palo Alto University and a research psychologist at the Stanford University School of Medicine, has accused Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaughof sexually assaulting her during a party in 1982 when they were high school students in suburban Maryland.
Christine Blasey Ford testifies before the U.S. Senate Judiciary Committee at the Dirksen Senate Office Building on Capitol Hill September 27, 2018 in Washington, DC. Blasey Ford, a professor at Palo Alto University and a research psychologist at the Stanford University School of Medicine, has accused Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaughof sexually assaulting her during a party in 1982 when they were high school students in suburban Maryland.

“‘I had one beer!’” Trump said at a rally. “How did you get home? ‘I don’t remember.’ How did you get there? ‘I don’t remember.’ Where is the place? ‘I don’t remember.’ How many years ago was it? ‘I don’t know. I don’t know. I don’t know!’”