Lori Loughlin "very upset and up in arms" against Varsity Blues Scandal whistleblower Morrie Tobin

Loughlin and actress Felicity Huffman were among 50 people named in the alleged conspiracy to defraud and undermine competitive student admissions at top colleges in the country


                            Lori Loughlin "very upset and up in arms" against Varsity Blues Scandal whistleblower Morrie Tobin

Actress Lori Loughlin is reportedly furious with finance executive Morrie Tobin for being the one to tip off the FBI about the college admissions scandal, which is now being known as the "Varsity Blues Scandal."

According to reports, Tobin is the executive vice president at Segami Images Inc, and was being investigated by the FBI in a securities-fraud case when he tipped off the authorities about the scam.

He reportedly told authorities that the head women's soccer coach at Yale had taken a bribe in return for getting his daughter into the University in an "effort to obtain leniency in his own case." It was only when the FBI started investigating that they realized how massive the scam was, and involved high profile celebrities like Loughlin and 'Desperate Housewives' actress Felicity Huffman.

Now it is being reported that the 54-year-old 'Fuller House' actress "is very upset and up in arms over what Morrie did."

A source revealed to Hollywood Life: "Several parents are hurt, disgusted and feeling betrayed by the man who ratted out the Varsity Blues scandal -- Morrie Tobin, including Lori Loughlin and Felicity Huffman."

The source told Hollywood Life: "Lori Loughlin is very upset and up in arms over what Morrie did. She is placing a lot of this blame on him. She, along with several other parents cannot believe he would do this. They’re livid. A lot of parents who feel just as stunned are rallying around her."



 

 

MEA WorldWide (MEAWW) previously reported that Loughlin and Huffman were among 50 people who were named on March 12 in an alleged conspiracy to defraud and undermine competitive student admissions at top colleges in the country.

According to the US Attorney's Office in Massachusetts, Loughlin’s husband, fashion designer Mossimo Giannulli is also one of the named parents.

The actresses were among the ultra-rich parents who were charged for the scandal, after allegedly bribing Ivy League universities like University of Southern California, Yale, and Stanford, up to $6.5 million to get their children admitted. The man behind the entire operation was revealed to be college prep business founder William "Rick" Singer.

According to the documents, Huffman has been charged with conspiracy to commit mail fraud and honest services mail fraud after being accused of paying $15,000 in a scheme to boost her daughter’s SAT scores. She was released on a $250,000 bond after her arrest last Tuesday and appeared in a Los Angeles court on Friday. According to the US Attorney's Office, Huffman's next preliminary court hearing is set to take place on March 29 at a Boston court.

Lori Loughlin attends WCRF's 'An Unforgettable Evening' at the Beverly Wilshire Four Seasons Hotel on February 27, 2018, in Beverly Hills, California. (Source: Frazer Harrison/Getty Images)
Lori Loughlin attends WCRF's 'An Unforgettable Evening' at the Beverly Wilshire Four Seasons Hotel on February 27, 2018, in Beverly Hills, California. (Source: Frazer Harrison/Getty Images)

 

Meanwhile, Loughlin and Giannulli allegedly bribed officials with over $500,000 in a bid to secure their daughters a spot on the USC crew team, despite the fact that they do not row. The pair was subsequently charged with conspiracy to commit mail fraud and honest services mail fraud.

Loughlin made her first appearance in a federal court in Los Angeles just hours after being taken into custody last Wednesday. According to the Associated Press, a judge set bonds for both Loughlin and Giannulli at $1 million each, which they posted and were released immediately after.

Cyclists ride by Hoover Tower on the Stanford University campus on March 12, 2019, in Stanford, California (Source: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
Cyclists ride by Hoover Tower on the Stanford University campus on March 12, 2019, in Stanford, California (Source: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

 

Massachusetts State Criminal Defense Attorney Edward Molari told Hollywood Life that it is possible that both Loughlin and Huffman could face 20 years in jail each for their involvement in the fraud case. He said: "Once someone is involved in a conspiracy, they are liable for the crimes committed by their co-conspirators. [Lori and Felicity] are alleged to have conspired to commit money laundering, mail, and wire fraud offenses. Each of those offenses carries a maximum of 20 years and fines of not more than $500,000 or twice the value of the property involved."

He also said, however, that giving the actresses 20 years of jail time may not end up being what the court decides. Molari concluded: "Jail is always a possibility in a criminal case, but I would not say it is a foregone conclusion."