Kylie Jenner mocked mercilessly on Twitter as she tried to copyright Rise And Shine phrase

Reality TV star Kylie Jenner was slammed online for attempting to trademark the iconic 'Rise and Shine' phrase.


                            Kylie Jenner mocked mercilessly on Twitter as she tried to copyright Rise And Shine phrase
Kylie Jenner (Getty Images)

Beauty mogul and reality star Kylie Jenner was mercilessly mocked on Twitter for her latest attempt at trademarking the iconic phrase 'rise and shine'. 

The mother-of-one filed multiple trademark applications for the phrase 'Rise and Shine', as per documents obtained by The Blast. Many fans and followers flocked to social media to call out Jenner for trying to copyright the popular phrase. According to the trademark application, Jenner wants to use the phrase on clothing as well as cosmetics.

 



 

She also tried to copyright an alternative spelling of the phrase 'Riiise and Shiiine'. Social media users were unimpressed with her latest venture and slammed her online. One user shared, "Can I trademark Good Morning?" Another user added, "How's Kylie Jenner trying to trademark the phrase 'rise and shine' every mum and dad will end up owing her ps before midday". 

A third angry user tweeted, "Someone needs to stop them or soon they'll trademark Sun and Earth". A few others commented on her quest for more money. One such user wrote, "Kylie's trying to trademark the phrase rise and shine lmaoo the mind of a billionaire". Kylie made headlines when she was seen waking up her baby girl Stormi by singing 'Rise and Shine' during a video tour of her office- Kylie Cosmetics. 

She had first revealed her hidden singing talents on Instagram when she was seen waking up Stormi. She has already made profits for the song and a $65 hoodie which had the phrase on it was seen on sale on Jenner's online store 'The Kylie Shop'. The hoodie has now been sold out. 

A few fans and followers online had also called out Kylie Jenner's brother-in-law Kanye West who recently failed to get his own trademark application for Sunday Service as someone else had already registered the name.