Kim Jong-un has had 421 officials executed with some fed alive to animals, burned with flamethrowers, report states

Report by Seoul-based North Korea Strategy Centre states multiple officials faced imprisonment or even death for minor infractions like slouching during events attended by Kim


                            Kim Jong-un has had 421 officials executed with some fed alive to animals, burned with flamethrowers, report states

North Korean dictator Kim Jong-un is using barbaric methods to "purge" his officials to maintain his hold over the totalitarian regime, according to an investigation report released by South Korea.

The report, which was released just days before Kim was to meet US President Donald Trump in Hanoi, claims that Kim has had at least 420 officials executed and exiled ever since coming to power in 2011.

The report states in gruesome details how he had some of the officials fed naked to hunting dogs, burned alive by flamethrowers, hanged, and blown up with anti-aircraft guns.

The report names over 50 victims who were "purged" during Kim's regime, while adding that hundreds more were executed by their supreme leader but were never named.

In certain cases, entire families of officials have also been executed while others were sent to concentration camps to be "erased from society," the Daily Mail reported. The report was released and analyzed at a Human Rights panel discussion last Friday in Washington.

(EDITORIAL USE ONLY, NO COMMERCIAL USE) North Korean leader Kim Jong Un attends a lunch at the Okryugwan restaurant on September 19, 2018 in Pyongyang, North Korea. (Gety Images)
(EDITORIAL USE ONLY, NO COMMERCIAL USE) North Korean leader Kim Jong Un attends a lunch at the Okryugwan restaurant on September 19, 2018 in Pyongyang, North Korea. (Gety Images)

The North Korean leader is also said to have ordered the execution of his own family members, including his uncle Jang Song Thaek, who was executed in 2013, and his half-brother Jong-nam, whose assassination at a Malaysian airport in 2017 made headlines across the country. 

According to accounts from high-ranking defectors, when Jong-un had his uncle Jang killed, "over 15 people were also killed and 400 others were purged."

The report, titled 'Executions and Purges of North Korean Elites: An Investigation into Genocide Based on High-Ranking Officials' Testimonies', was researched by North Korea Strategy Centre (NKSC), which is based in Seoul.

The report details accounts of at least 14 North Korean elite group defectors, six North Korean officials in China and five other defectors who witnessed some of the executions. 

South Korean President Moon Jae-in (R) walks with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un (L) before their meeting at Paekhwawon State Guesthouse on September 19, 2018 in Pyongyang, North Korea. Kim and Moon meet for the Inter-Korean summit talks after the 1945 division of the peninsula, and will discuss ways to denuclearize the Korean Peninsula. (Getty Images)
South Korean President Moon Jae-in (R) walks with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un (L) before their meeting at Paekhwawon State Guesthouse on September 19, 2018 in Pyongyang, North Korea. Kim and Moon meet for the Inter-Korean summit talks after the 1945 division of the peninsula, and will discuss ways to denuclearize the Korean Peninsula. (Getty Images)

According to the investigation carried out by NKSC, it was found that the North Korean dictator ordered the execution of his uncle because he "sold the country's resources to foreign countries at a low price."

The report also states that multiple officials faced imprisonment or even death for minor infractions like slouching during an event which was attended by Kim.

A former student at Pyongyang Commercial College, identified as only Moon, in the report claimed that he had witnessed a 12-man public execution by soldiers using four anti-aircraft guns. He said that he saw four guns blowing up the victims one by one and later armored vehicles were used to crush the remains of the victims.

The former student claimed that he suffered from PTSD after witnessing the killings, according to Radio Free Asia (RFA).

A member of the Human Rights in North Korea's (HRNK) International Advisory Council, Jared Genser, last Friday explained that these brutal methods were employed by Kim to strike fear in the hearts of the entire population.

"They need to instill fear into people working for the authoritarian leader, and they need to keep people at bay by making them very fearful that anything they say or do could result in torture, extrajudicial killing, arbitrary detention and so forth," Genser said.