Kathryn Pugh: Drunk nurse fired shots into neighbor's apartment over piano noise

Judge Terry Lee Smerling sent her to jail without bail, calling her 'a danger to the community'


                            Kathryn Pugh: Drunk nurse fired shots into neighbor's apartment over piano noise
Kathryn Pugh is in jail without bond (Twitter/ @huntingtonnews)
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ARCADIA, CALIFORNIA: A nurse from Arcadia has been accused of firing several shots into her neighbor's apartment. Kathryn Pugh has been put behind bars without bail as she allegedly discharged her handgun under the influence of alcohol at the 600 block of Sunset Boulevard apartment of Pin Hsin Lin. The apparent reason behind it was a continuing contention between her and Lin, who gives piano lessons.

After her arrest on Monday, August 1, Arcadia police Sgt Ryan Mulhall said, “We found an intoxicated female in possession of two guns. We discovered she shot two rounds through a downstairs apartment unit. We found a bottle of tequila inside her house, and she was exhibiting signs and symptoms of being drunk.”

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As per reports, the victim called 911 after two bullets entered her house, piercing her roof. It has been said that Lin could have been injured too because she was inside the house when the bullets came through. She stated, “Suddenly, there's a straight bullet. When I saw the hole, I was like, 'This is a real gunshot!' So I called police immediately.”

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Lin went on to explain the feud between her and Pugh, who is a registered nurse and was presented a DAISY Award at Huntington Health in Arcadia in 2019. She said that she’s a piano teacher, who has been training her students from her apartment for almost three years. And, in these years, no one complained of noise but when the accused came to live there, she began having issues.

Lin also said that on Monday, she first heard a blasting sound at around mid-day, which was followed by two more later in the day. But it was the fourth time when she recognized those were actually firearm shots as she saw one entering through her ceiling. Eventually, she also found another bullet hole in a kitchen cabinet. "The rice cooker was just right below the bullet hole," Lin added.

After being taken into custody, Pugh’s bond amount was first set at $250,000 and later it was set at $500,000. However, Judge Terry Lee Smerling eventually sent her to jail without bail, calling her “a danger to the community”. Karla Sarabia, the public defender, said, “To us, that's absolutely tragic,” before adding, “Conceivably until she goes to trial, so that could take months and in a serious case like this, maybe even longer. She's going to lose her job, she's going to lose her apartment, she's going to lose her livelihood.”

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Marie, Pugh’s mother, also expressed her disappointment. She said, “She has no priors, she's a responsible person, she went to Berkeley, she got a scholarship, she got a 4.0 (grade point average). She is one of the best people ever put on this Earth.” But Lin does not feel the same as she claimed, “I am afraid that she will (seek) revenge.” The accused is expected to appear before the court on August 16.

Meanwhile, Fox News reported that the judge’s decision was quite opposite to what Los Angeles District Attorney George Gascon believes. In March, the DA's office said: “The District Attorney remains firmly committed to the core principles that the voters of Los Angeles embraced, including the goals of eliminating cash bail and maximizing pretrial release within the bounds of public safety.”

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“Throughout the past 18 months, we have identified some gaps in our existing system of pretrial supervision that require slight adjustments to the manner in which we pursue those goals. For individuals who pose an exceptional risk to public safety, including those who have committed additional crimes while on pretrial release, the office may request bail under a narrowly tailored set of circumstances,” it added.

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