John Lennon's murderer apologizes to Yoko Ono, says he deserves death penalty for the 'despicable act'

John Lennon's murderer apologizes to Yoko Ono, says he deserves death penalty for the 'despicable act'
Mark David Chapman, Yoko Ono, John Lennon (Getty Images)

John Lennon's killer has apologized to the singing legend's widow Yoko Ono and revealed that he thinks about the 'despicable act' all the time. Mark David Chapman, 65, was denied parole for the 11th time after a hearing which had taken place last month. Ever since he killed the former 'Beatle' member in Manhattan in 1980, Chapman has been locked up. He shot Lennon around four times while outside the Dakota apartment building in the Upper West Side, the Daily Mail reveals. 

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According to a transcript of the parole hearing, the board had rejected Chapman's release and said it "would be incompatible with the welfare of society." During the hearing, Chapman had revealed that he had killed Lennon, 40, for 'glory' and admitted that he should be given the death penalty. 

He said, "I just want to reiterate that I'm sorry for my crime. I have no excuse. This was for self-glory. I think it's the worst crime that there could be to do something to someone that's innocent. He (Lennon) was extremely famous. I didn't kill him because of his character or the kind of man he was. He was a family man. He was an icon. He was someone that spoke of things that now we can speak of and it's great."

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John Lennon (1940 -1980), singer, songwriter, and guitarist of British pop group The Beatles, with his wife Yoko Ono listening to the playback of one of their tapes (Getty Images) 

The killer apologized to Lennon's family and said he thinks about the murder "all the time". "I assassinated him, to use your word earlier because he was very, very, very famous and that's the only reason and I was very, very, very, very much seeking self-glory, very selfish," he said. 

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"I want to add that and emphasize that greatly. It was an extremely selfish act. I'm sorry for the pain that I caused to her (Ono). I think about it all of the time," he added. At the time of the incident, Chapman had been 25 and said now he is older and can see it was a "despicable act" and "pretty creepy". 

Many social media users commented on the news of Chapman's apology and slammed him saying it was too late. One such user had commented and written, "Oh That’s Nice.... Yoko who lost her husband and the rest of us who have been deprived of his talent can feel much better now." Another user took to social media to share, "If he had being rightfully given the Lethal injection, he wouldn't have the luxury of being able to 'think about the crime all the time'."

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"Following the path of Christ and seeking for genuine forgiveness and to genuinely repent should always be welcomed. Although, staying in prison for life is probably the best choice for all," commented another social media user. Yet another user who echoed the same sentiments also shared, "Let’s hope that he has a few more hard day’s nights. Blinking chancer. Even now I think of the loss John Lennon was to our World. John, Paul, George and Ringo- changed most people ‘s thinking at the time. Only played their albums last week to bring back memories of good times."

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Chapman is married with his wife, 69, living close to the prison. Chapman himself believes he deserves the death penalty and said, "When you knowingly plot someone's murder and know it's wrong and you do it for yourself, that's a death penalty right there in my opinion."

"Some people disagree with me, but everybody gets a second chance now," he revealed. "He was a human being and I knew I was going to kill him. That alone says you deserve nothing and if the law and you choose to leave me in here for the rest of my life, I have no complaint whatsoever."

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