Joe Biden says domestic violence will end if we 'keep punching at it' as he continues his gaffe spree at Atlanta debates

During the Democratic presidential debate held in Atlanta, the former vice president drew laughs from the audience as he appeared to be unaware of the metaphor he was using to explain how he would combat violence and sexual harassment perpetrated against women


                            Joe Biden says domestic violence will end if we 'keep punching at it' as he continues his gaffe spree at Atlanta debates

Joe Biden has promised to "keep punching at" domestic violence if he is elected President.

During the Democratic presidential debate held in Atlanta on Wednesday, November 20, night, the former vice president drew laughs from the audience as he appeared to be unaware of the metaphor he was using to explain how he would combat violence and sexual harassment perpetrated against women.

"No man has a right to raise a hand to a woman in anger other than in self-defense, and that rarely ever occurs," Biden said. "And so we have to just change the culture, period, and keep punching at it, and punching at it, and punching at it."

"The fact is that what happens now, is that we have to fundamentally change the culture, the culture of how women are treated," the 2020 presidential hopeful added. 

Biden has been mocked throughout his campaign for his numerous gaffes, and his "punching" comments were not the only ones that drew curious responses from the audience.

The former vice president began defending his record of support from black voters after Senator Cory Booker challenged him over his opposition to legalizing marijuana.

Biden went on to boast how he had the support of several prominent members of the African-American community. He mentioned an endorsement from Carol Moseley Braun, a former senator from Illinois who became the first African American woman to be elected to the body.

But rather unsurprisingly, Biden mistakenly referred to her as the "only" African American woman who was elected to the Senate — when Senator Kamala Harris was standing just a few feet away from him on the debate stage.

"Nope. That's not true," Harris chimed in. "The other one is here." The sensational exchange drew roaring laughs from the audience.

"Proud to be the second Black woman elected to the US Senate," the senator from California, whose mother was Indian and father Jamaican, tweeted after the debate.

Biden had just over the weekend on Sunday, November 17, said that President Donald Trump had been in office for eight years, as we had reported earlier.

"We can handle with a lot of difficulty eight years of Donald Trump," Biden said. "Excuse me, four years of Donald Trump," the 2020 presidential hopeful corrected himself, before making a gesture of the cross over himself and drawing laughs from the audience.

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