Edward Snowden warns ‘Julian Assange could be next' after John McAfee and Epstein's ‘suicides'

'Prison system so cruel—that native-born defendants would rather die than become subject to it,' said Edward Snowden


                            Edward Snowden warns ‘Julian Assange could be next' after John McAfee and Epstein's ‘suicides'
Edward Snowden, John McAfee, Julian Assange and Jeffrey Epstein (Credits: Twitter/Jack Taylor/Getty Images/ Florida Department of Law Enforcement via Getty Images/Florida Department of Law Enforcement via Getty Images/ Phillip Faraone/Getty Images for WIR

Anti-virus software entrepreneur allegedly John McAfee hanged himself in his Spanish jail cell on Wednesday, June 23. Now, former National Security Agency consultant Edward Snowden made a cryptic tweet, saying that Julian Assange "could be next."

Snowden tweeted, "Europe should not extradite those accused of non-violent crimes to a court system so unfair—and prison system so cruel—that native-born defendants would rather die than become subject to it. Julian Assange could be next. Until the system is reformed, a moratorium should remain." He later said, "Turns out McAfee was American, but born British. I regret the error," and "Because everything with McAfee is complicated, it turns out he was still born American after all -- he was merely born outside the United States. I regret regretting the error."

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The 35-year-old computer wiz, Snowden became a high-demand fugitive himself after serving as a Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) employee and ex-contractor for the United States Government. Snowden’s cryptic tweet comes on the day that the 75-year-old McAfee who was on the run from the feds was found dead inside of a Spanish jail cell, according to his attorney. As of now, there appear to be no signs of foul play, the Spanish newspaper El Pais reported.

Edward Snowden speaks remotely WIRED25 Festival: WIRED Celebrates 25th Anniversary – Day 2 on October 14, 2018 in San Francisco, California. (Photo by Phillip Faraone/Getty Images for WIRED25 )

McAfee was described as being dragged from his cell after reportedly hanging himself, with a justice department official insisting: "Everything points to suicide.” The fugitive, who had authorities in Belize after him over the murder of an American neighbor as well as the feds pursuing him for tax evasion expressed fears his life was at risk. In an old tweet, McAfee appeared to show off a tattoo reading "whackd" as he accused US officials of targeting him. He said, "Getting subtle messages from U.S. officials saying, in effect: "We're coming for you McAfee! We're going to kill yourself". I got a tattoo today just in case. If I suicide myself, I didn't. I was whackd. Check my right arm."



 

The message was allegedly in direct response to his suspicion that pedophile billionaire Jeffrey Epstein didn't die of suicide. “His cellmate was taken from his cell six hours before his death, the video cameras were off and the guards in that cell block were sent home early due to cleaning. “You add all that stuff up, and I don’t see how a suicide is possible,” he said only months after Epstein was found dead inside a federal jail in Manhattan.

In May 2013, Snowden escaped to Hong Kong, ditching his job at a National Security Agency (NSA) facility in Hawaii, and then proceeded to leak millions of detailed NSA reports from a hotel room, mostly by Julian Assange’s WikiLeaks platform. On June 21, 2013, federal prosecutors made charges against Snowden of two counts of infringing the Espionage Act of 17 and embezzlement of government property. At that time, Snowden succeeded to avoid the arrest and trial after Russia granted him refuge in 2013. Presently, he is living at a closely guarded location in Moscow. He has lately stated that he'd like to return back to the US, only if he's granted a fair trial. He said returning to the States is the "ultimate goal."

Meanwhile, since being pulled out of the Ecuadorian embassy by Metropolitan Police in London back in April 2019 after hiding out there for seven years, Julian Assange was taken into custody. He remained held on charges for publishing a cache of leaked files in 2010 and 2011 in a conspiracy with US Army intelligence analyst Chelsea Manning. The 500,000 secret files detailed features of military campaigns in Afghanistan and Iraq and sensitive diplomatic cables about Guantanamo Bay. A US grand jury arraigned him on 18 charges last year, including 17 under the Espionage Act.

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