Hillary Clinton rejects Bill Clinton-Brett Kavanaugh comparisons, says there's a 'very significant difference'

Hillary was referring to the investigation led by special counsel Kenneth Starr into allegations against her husband during the 1990s, which led to his impeachment


                            Hillary Clinton rejects Bill Clinton-Brett Kavanaugh comparisons, says there's a 'very significant difference'

Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton on Tuesday said the accusations against her husband — former President Bill Clinton — were unlike the sexual assault allegations against Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh or President Donald Trump, because unlike these two her husband underwent "intense investigation."

Hillary was referring to the investigation led by special counsel Kenneth Starr into allegations against her husband during the 1990s which led to his impeachment. She added that "intense" and "partisan probe" is what distinguished it from the allegations against Trump and Kavanaugh. The president's Supreme Court nominee was sworn into the permanent position to the SC on Monday after weathering a series of sexual assault allegations from at least three victims from his high school and college.

U.S. President Bill Clinton speaks in the Rose Garden, May 24, 2000 in Washington, D.C. after the China trade vote in Congress. Clinton expressed his satisfaction that the House of Representatives voted to create permanent normal trade relations with China.
U.S. President Bill Clinton speaks in the Rose Garden, May 24, 2000 in Washington, D.C. after the China trade vote in Congress. Clinton expressed his satisfaction that the House of Representatives voted to create permanent normal trade relations with China.

Hillary, while talking to CNN's Christiane Amanpour, said her husband "really believes that Democrats have to be tougher and have to stand up to the bullying and the intimidation, so I think he’ll have things to say about his own experience and how it applies here."

"I will certainly have a lot to say about what’s going on in the world today based on not only my Secretary of State years but my travel, and my book, What Happened, which came out in paperback," Hillary said. The former Secretary of State, who is joining her husband for a joint speaking tour where tickets are going for up to $700 each, was asked by the veteran CNN journalist that people —during the tour — would question how similar her husband's impeachment and "allegations of sexual harassment" is to the current situation.

Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh testifies before the Senate Judiciary Committee on the third day of his Supreme Court confirmation hearing on Capitol Hill September 6, 2018 in Washington, DC. Kavanaugh was nominated by President Donald Trump to fill the vacancy on the court left by retiring Associate Justice Anthony Kennedy.
Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh testifies before the Senate Judiciary Committee on the third day of his Supreme Court confirmation hearing on Capitol Hill September 6, 2018 in Washington, DC. Kavanaugh was nominated by President Donald Trump to fill the vacancy on the court left by retiring Associate Justice Anthony Kennedy.

"There’s a very significant difference. And that is the intense, long-lasting partisan investigation that was conducted in the 90s," Hillary responded. "If, you know, the Republicans, starting with President Trump on down want a comparison, they should welcome such an investigation themselves." The Republican president slammed Hillary's political skills again on Tuesday, after she called out Trump on his apology to Brett Kavanaugh "on behalf of our nation." She called his confirmation to the Supreme Court a "political rally" that "undermined" the integrity of the court, according to reports.

Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton speaks to the audience at the annual convention of the American Federation of Teachers Friday, July 13, 2018 at the David L. Lawrence Convention Center in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.
Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton speaks to the audience at the annual convention of the American Federation of Teachers Friday, July 13, 2018 at the David L. Lawrence Convention Center in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

"What was done last night in the White House was a political rally. It further undermined the image and integrity of the court. And that troubles me greatly. It saddens me. Because our judicial system has been viewed as one of the main pillars of our constitutional government," Hillary said while speaking to CNN.