'Not a chance': Flake admits he would not have deviated from party line and asked for FBI probe if he was seeking re-election

The Supreme Court nominee has also been accused of sexual misconduct by two other women — Deborah Ramirez and Julie Swetnick. Kavanaugh, however, has denied all the allegations.


                            'Not a chance': Flake admits he would not have deviated from party line and asked for FBI probe if he was seeking re-election

Republican Senator of Arizona, Jeff Flake, on Sunday said that if he were running for re-election, there was "not a chance" that he would have called for an FBI investigation into the sexual assault allegations laid against President Donald Trump's Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh.

Flake made the statement during his appearance on CBS' '60 Minutes.' The Senator said "not a chance" after he was asked if he would have asked for the probe into Kavanaugh allegations if he were running for the midterm elections in November.



 

"There’s no value to reaching across the aisle. There’s no currency for that anymore. There’s no incentive," Flake said.

Flake made the statement days after Senate voting on Kavanaugh's nomination and the extraordinary and historic hearing of clinical psychology professor Dr. Christine Blasey Ford, who publicly detailed her sexual assault allegations against Kavanaugh in front of the Senate Judiciary Committee last week.

Ford's testimony, was widely seen as credible as she asked for an FBI investigation into her claims and stood in stark contrast to Kavanaugh's, who not even once conceded to an FBI investigation, repeatedly suggesting that the Senate hearing was enough. The Supreme Court nominee has also been accused of sexual misconduct by two other women — Deborah Ramirez and Julie Swetnick. Kavanaugh, however, has denied all the allegations.

 

Judge Brett Kavanaugh pauses while delivering his opening statement during his Supreme Court confirmation hearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee in the Hart Senate Office Building on Capitol Hill, September 4, 2018 in Washington, DC. Kavanaugh was nominated by President Donald Trump to fill the vacancy on the court left by retiring Associate Justice Anthony Kennedy.
Judge Brett Kavanaugh pauses while delivering his opening statement during his Supreme Court confirmation hearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee in the Hart Senate Office Building on Capitol Hill, September 4, 2018 in Washington, DC. Kavanaugh was nominated by President Donald Trump to fill the vacancy on the court left by retiring Associate Justice Anthony Kennedy.

The Senate Judiciary Committee subsequently agreed on an FBI investigation into the allegations after Republican Senator Jeff Flake said that he would withdraw his vote if an FBI investigation is not conducted. Flake, before calling for the investigation, was confronted by a woman in an elevator of the Senate building, who said that she was a victim of sexual assault. 

The Arizona senator, in a statement on Sunday, said that the encounter with the woman in the elevator along with the testimonies he had heard on Thursday made him think that the hearings are "tearing the country apart." 

Christine Blasey Ford prepares to testify before the Senate Judiciary Committee in the Dirksen Senate Office Building on Capitol Hill September 27, 2018 in Washington, DC. A professor at Palo Alto University and a research psychologist at the Stanford University School of Medicine, Ford has accused Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh of sexually assaulting her during a party in 1982 when they were high school students in suburban Maryland.
Christine Blasey Ford prepares to testify before the Senate Judiciary Committee in the Dirksen Senate Office Building on Capitol Hill September 27, 2018 in Washington, DC. A professor at Palo Alto University and a research psychologist at the Stanford University School of Medicine, Ford has accused Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh of sexually assaulting her during a party in 1982 when they were high school students in suburban Maryland.

 

Flake, during the interview, also said that he plans to vote along with other Republicans to confirm Kavanaugh's nomination unless the FBI investigation finds something. 

“If Judge Kavanaugh is shown to have lied to the committee, nomination’s over?” CBS News’ Scott Pelley asked Flake in the '60 Minutes' interview. "Oh yes," Flake responded. In another interview appearance with The Atlantic, the senator said that he would vote for Kavanaugh "unless they turn up something — and they might.”