'Fatal Attraction' killer Carolyn Warmus who shot her lover's wife nine times in the back in 1989 is granted parole

'Fatal Attraction' killer Carolyn Warmus, 55, could be released from Bedford Hills prison as early as June 10 after she was granted parole on Friday by a three-member panel of the state parole board.


                            'Fatal Attraction' killer Carolyn Warmus who shot her lover's wife nine times in the back in 1989 is granted parole

The school teacher who was put behind bars for murdering her lover's wife in the notorious Fatal Attraction murder case is set to be released from jail.

Carolyn Warmus, 55, fatally shot Betty Jeanne Solomon, her lover's wife, nine times in the back in 1989, Daily Mail reports.

In 1992, Warmus was sentenced to 25 years to life in prison for the devious murder. The case was widely likened to the blockbuster film 'Fatal Attraction' that had released in 1987, just two years before the killing. The movie plot centers around a woman who seeks to harm her lover's wife out of pure obsession.

A three-member panel of the State Parole Board granted Warmus her release from Bedford Hills prison on Friday. She was earlier denied parole after her initial 2017 appearance in front of the board.

The daughter of a millionaire insurance executive, Warmus worked as a teacher at Greenville Elementary School in Scarsdale, New York back in the '80s. When she began having an affair with fellow teacher Paul Solomon, then 40, she was only 23.

Warmus killed Solomon's wife Betty Jean on January 15, 1989, firing nine shots into her back.

According to the report, she met up with Paul for drinks at a hotel bar after committing the horrific murder and went on to have sex with him in his car.  

In 1991, Warmus' first trial saw the jurors deadlocked 8-4 in favor of conviction. However, she was found guilty of second-degree murder the following year.

New York City private investigator Vincent Parco became the key witness in the trial after he testified to selling a .25-caliber handgun with a silencer to Warmus just days before the homicide. That said, Warmus has always denied culpability and maintained her innocence in the case.

According to the New York Post, she insisted during her first parole hearing that she "was found guilty because of the media attention and the publicity" but was actually innocent.