'They said I look like Elvis': Trump compares himself to King of Rock 'n' Roll while campaigning in his hometown

President Donald Trump was campaigning for Republican Sneator Cindy Hyde-Smith when he digressed from his speech to compare himself to Elvis Presley


                            'They said I look like Elvis': Trump compares himself to King of Rock 'n' Roll while campaigning in his hometown

President Donald Trump has never been one to shy away from making claims and statements his critics may construe as vain but his recent suggestion that he was compared to Elvis Presley in the past might have even his most ardent supporters scratching their heads.

According to the Daily Mail, the billionaire mogul brought up the comparison while he was campaigning for Republican Senator Cindy Hyde-Smith in Tupelo, Mississippi, the hometown of the 'King of Rock and Roll.' Trump was in town in the hope his last-minute campaigning efforts would help Hyde-Smith stave off the competition from former three-term Democratic Congressman Mike Espy, who has already forced his opponent into a run-off. In the middle of his speech, Trump digressed into a monologue about Presley.

(L-R) Republican candidate for U.S. Senate Cindy Hyde-Smith is introduced by President Donald Trump during a rally at the Tupelo Regional Airport, November 26, 2018, in Tupelo, Mississippi. President Trump is holding two rallies on Monday in Mississippi, in support of Republican candidate for U.S. Senate Cindy Hyde-Smith, who faces off against Democratic candidate Mike Espy in a runoff election on Tuesday. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
(L-R) Republican candidate for U.S. Senate Cindy Hyde-Smith is introduced by President Donald Trump during a rally at the Tupelo Regional Airport, November 26, 2018, in Tupelo, Mississippi. President Trump is holding two rallies on Monday in Mississippi, in support of Republican candidate for U.S. Senate Cindy Hyde-Smith, who faces off against Democratic candidate Mike Espy in a runoff election on Tuesday. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

Trump brought up the legendary singer saying, "I am thrilled to be back in Tupelo. I love Tupelo. All the thousands of hard-working American patriots. And the proud birthplace of the King of Rock and Roll, Elvis," and adding, "Elvis! We love Elvis!"

It was here that he brought up his apparent similarities to the 'Heartbreak Hotel' hitmaker, announcing to the gathered supporters that he was once told he looked like Elvis. "I shouldn't say this, you'll say I'm very conceited, cause I'm not," he said, before continuing and claiming, "Other than the blonde hair, when I was growing up, they said I look like Elvis. Do you see that, can you believe it? I always considered that a great compliment. We love Elvis, don't we?"

Trump also brought up the recent ceremony at the White House where Elvis was posthumously bestowed the country's highest civilian honor, the Presidential Medal of Freedom. "In fact, we just gave Elvis the Medal of Freedom at the White House," he announced.

Jack Soden (L), president and chief executive officer of Elvis Presley Enterprises, receives the Presidential Medal of Freedom on behalf of the late singer from U.S. President Donald Trump (R) during an East Room ceremony at the White House November 16, 2018, in Washington, DC. The award is the nation's highest civilian honor that present to individuals who have made significant contributions to the United States of America. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
Jack Soden (L), president and chief executive officer of Elvis Presley Enterprises, receives the Presidential Medal of Freedom on behalf of the late singer from U.S. President Donald Trump (R) during an East Room ceremony at the White House November 16, 2018, in Washington, DC. The award is the nation's highest civilian honor that present to individuals who have made significant contributions to the United States of America. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)

Designed to recognize those individuals who have made "an especially meritorious contribution to the security or national interests of the United States, world peace, cultural or other significant public or private endeavors," a White House spokesperson explained that Elvis had been chosen because he "defined American culture to billions of adoring fans around the world." The award was accepted on behalf of the singer by President and CEO of Elvis Presley Enterprises Jack Soden.

While Trump had not brought up his comparison to Elvis during that ceremony, he did reminisce about the singer's "electric performances" and "unbreakable bond with his fans" and bring up a concert he attended himself. "In fact, at the end of a performance, oftentimes the fans would go so wild — I was there once in Las Vegas, at the Hilton," he revealed.

"The fans were ripping the place apart, screaming," he continued. "They were going crazy. And they announced, 'Elvis has left the house. Elvis…' If they didn’t say that, I think I’d still be there. Maybe I wouldn’t be here. But they had to do that. 'Elvis has gone. Elvis has left.'"