Daunte Wright shooting: Kim Potter trained in firearms, felony stop procedures before mistaking taser for gun

Potter's body camera video recording showed her shouting, “Taser! Taser!” before she shot Wright with her gun


                            Daunte Wright shooting: Kim Potter trained in firearms, felony stop procedures before mistaking taser for gun
Kimberly Potter is the officer who shot Daunte Wright (Kim Potter via LinkedIn/ Twitter)

Former Brooklyn Center police officer Kim Potter, charged in the fatal shooting of Daunte Wright, a 20-year-old Black motorist in Minneapolis, earlier this month, had completed the firearms 'felony stop procedures' according to her service file. 

Potter is charged with second-degree manslaughter in Wright’s death. Brooklyn Center Police Chief Tim Gannon said at the time that he believed Wright mistakenly fired her handgun instead of her Taser weapon. His claim was backed by Potter's body camera video recording, which showed her shouting, “Taser! Taser!” before she shot Wright. Potter was arrested and booked into jail on April 14. She was released later that day after posting a $100,000 bond.

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Kim Potter's extensive police training

The Associated Press was able to obtain Potter’s job application, letters of recognition, pay information, and a training status letter after requesting the documents under the Minnesota Government Data Practices Act. When the documents on her training were released to AP on Monday, April 26, most of the sections of the documents were redacted. 

Former Brooklyn Center Police Officer Kim Potter poses for a mugshot at the Hennepin County Jail on April 14, 2021 in Minneapolis, Minnesota (Getty Images)

The little that was accessible from the records showed Potter earned a bachelor’s degree in criminal justice from St Mary’s College in Winona. She went on to complete her law enforcement skills training at Alexandria Technical College before joining the Brooklyn Center Police Department in late February 1995. Five months later, Potter completed training courses in policy and procedures, firearms, and “felony stop procedures,” among others, according to the documents.

Sections such as volunteer experience, financial history, driving record, and criminal history, among others were blacked out from the training status letter. It is not yet known whether materials, including commendations or discipline, are being withheld.

The records did show, however, that Potter volunteered for the Minnesota Law Enforcement Memorial Association’s honor guard, which marches at funerals and memorials for officers killed in the line of duty, before she became a hostage negotiator, field training officer, and the local union president.

Kim Potter's hearing

Activists march towards the Multnomah County Sheriff's office during a protest against the killing of Daunte Wright on April 12, 2021 in Portland, Oregon (Getty Images)

The next court hearing for Potter is scheduled for May 17. It will be conducted remotely by Judge Regina Chu. Potter's case was handed over from Hennepin County to the Washington County Attorney's Office in order to avoid any conflict of interest. If convicted, Potter faces up to 10 years in prison and a $20,000 fine.

"The Washington County Attorney's office remains committed to providing justice and accountability through our legal system for the killing of Daunte Wright," Imran Ali, assistant criminal division chief for the Washington County Attorney's Office, said in a news release on Monday, April 26.

The statement added, "In order for the system to work, we must remain committed to justice and provide due process to the defendant as afforded to her by the law. While we wait for the case and the process to move forward, it is important for everyone to remain focused only on the facts related to details of this tragic case. The Bureau of Criminal Apprehension is working hard and remains committed to providing all their resources to aid in this investigation to make sure justice and accountability is upheld."

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