'Daredevil' season 3 episode 4 11-minute fight sequence shot in single take

Erik Oleson revealed the fight scene was actually an 11-minute take and not various shots joined together, unlike the fight sequence we witnessed in the first season


                            'Daredevil' season 3 episode 4 11-minute fight sequence shot in single take

When Netflix's 'Daredevil' aired in 2015, it went viral because of one particular fight sequence that was edited together in order to make it look like an uninterrupted shot for a total of three minutes. That particular hallway fight earned around 2 million views on YouTube and made Marvel fans sit on pins, wondering when they will do something like that again. 

If you have already watched all 13 episodes of the newly premiered season 3 of 'Daredevil,' it would have come to your notice that in the fourth episode titled 'Blindsided' there is a fight scene that lasts a total of 10 minutes 43 seconds.

Now is when you should hold on to your hats because what makes this scene extra special and jaw-dropping isn't just the length of the fight sequence, but the fact that the entire sequence was shot in a single take. In an interview with Vulture, showrunner Erik Oleson revealed the fight scene was actually an 11-minute take and not various shots joined together, unlike the fight sequence we witnessed in the first season. 



 

“I had built in some places where we could’ve hidden cuts if it didn’t work, like the darkened hallway where he’s looking up and the red lights are flashing,” Oleson said. “But instead, in post-production, I insisted on using a true one-take and I lightened that hallway so that the audience can see that there are no hidden cuts.”

The origin of this idea came from episode director Alex Garcia Lopez. Olsen admitted when Lopez pitched the idea, he was shocked and had met with a couple of roadblocks too, mainly because it would take hours of rehearsal to pull a fight scene like that in one take.



 

“I had to call all the financial people and say, ‘Guess what? We’re gonna stop filming for a day but have the entire crew there to rehearse,’” Oleson said. “From television production, that’s definitely caused some agita.” Tom Lieber, the vice president of Marvel TV admitted to Vulture he was quite apprehensive of the idea at first. “I was like, ‘This is 12 pages of script,’ He’s like, ‘Yeah, I know! Isn’t that crazy?’ I’m like, ‘Yeah, it is!’” Marvel finally decided to give it a chance and go ahead with the plan given the willingness and positivity of the cast and crew.

"Charlie was really excited about it,” Lieber said. “Our camera [operator] was really excited about it. Alex was beaming about it. We were like, ‘We should just do it. We should just try it. We have to set them up for success with this.’”



 

The one-take fight sequence was shot in an abandoned prison in Staten Island and 80% of the fight was performed by Charlie Cox himself. And, in order to bring the sub in without anyone noticing, the stunt team started to practice a technique called the 'Texas Switches'.

"The stunt guys came up with some very clever ways of doing it,” Lopez said. “For example, when he’s in the hallway where the police guys come at him and start hitting him with the baton, one moment it’s Brewster, and then he gets hit with the baton a bunch of times. He falls down, he gives one kick, which is him, and then the second kick is given by Charlie, sort of laying next to him, and then Charlie gets up. So there’s these constant Texas switches happening throughout the oner.”