Coronavirus: John Cusack tells Trump to ‘rot in hell’ after POTUS blasts reporter questioning unproven drug

The 'Serendipity' actor disapproved of Trump's reaction during a press conference where NBC News reporter Peter Alexander asked the president questions about his coronavirus response


                            Coronavirus: John Cusack tells Trump to ‘rot in hell’ after POTUS blasts reporter questioning unproven drug
(Getty Images)
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Actor John Cusack slammed President Donald Trump on Friday after the Republican lashed out at an NBC News reporter during that day's White House press conference on the coronavirus pandemic. 

The 'Serendipity' actor disapproved of Trump's reaction during the press conference when NBC News reporter Peter Alexander asked the president some tough questions. When Alexander asked Trump about what his message would be to Americans who are frightened by the coronavirus pandemic, the president blasted the reporter in response, saying: "You are a terrible reporter."

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Cusack shared a clip of the tense exchange between the two in the White House on Twitter, saying: "Rot in hell - Mr. President," the actor also suggested that Trump's response was "unreal."

U.S. President Donald Trump debates with NBC News White House Correspondent Peter Alexander during a news briefing on the latest development of the coronavirus outbreak in the U.S. at the James Brady Press Briefing Room at the White House March 20, 2020 in Washington, DC. (Getty Images)

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During the press conference on Friday, Alexander asked Trump whether he was giving "false hope" by touting unproven drugs for coronavirus, which is swiftly spreading across the country. The president responded by saying he does not think so. 

“It is possible that your impulse to put a positive spin on things may be giving Americans a false sense of hope about our level of preparedness right now?” Alexander asked. Trump answered, saying: "No I don’t think so. I don’t think so… such a lovely question."

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The reporter then asked: "What do you say to Americans who are scared? Nearly 200 dead, thousands sick and millions are scared right now. What do you say to Americans who are watching you right now and are scared?"

Trump then shook his head and said: "I say that you are a terrible reporter. That's what I say." The president then extended his lashing, saying that Alexander has asked him a "nasty question."

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"I think that’s a very nasty question, and I think that’s a very bad signal that you’re putting out to the American people," Trump said during the press conference.

U.S. President Donald Trump debates with NBC News White House Correspondent Peter Alexander during a news briefing on the latest development of the coronavirus outbreak in the U.S. at the James Brady Press Briefing Room at the White House March 20, 2020 in Washington, DC. (Getty Images)

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The president continued: “The American people are looking for answers and they’re looking for hope. And you’re doing sensationalism, and the same with NBC and ‘Concast.’ I don’t call it ‘Comcast,’ I call it ‘Concast,’ for whom you work. Let me just tell you something: that’s really bad reporting. And you ought to get back to reporting instead of sensationalism.”

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The president's response received widespread backlash on social media, with even filmmaker Rob Reiner weighing in on the exchange. "When Trump was asked by NBC’s Peter Alexander what he would say to people who are scared right now, he exhibited his severe mental instability and scared US all shitless," the filmmaker tweeted. 

The coronavirus pandemic has taken over 250 lives and has infected nearly 20,000 people within days, with most cases being reported in New York. Trump on Friday declared New York State a major disaster area as the number of confirmed coronavirus cases continued to skyrocket in the region. New York City is currently considered the epicenter of the outbreak in the area. The deadly viral infection, COVID-19, has claimed nearly 10,000 lives across the world, with a total infection of over 220,000 and increasing. 

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