CNN, BBC taken off the air by Venezuelan government, as Nicolás Maduro declares victory over uprising

CNN reported that broadcast providers like DirecTV, Net Uno, Intercable, and Telefónica have "all received orders from Venezuela's government regulator Conatel to block CNN."


                            CNN, BBC taken off the air by Venezuelan government, as Nicolás Maduro declares victory over uprising

Venezuela government took media networks like CNN and BBC off air in the country on Tuesday amid an apparent coup by supporters of National Assembly leader Juan Guaidó. The news was confirmed by CNN's breaking news Twitter feed.

CNN reported that broadcast providers like DirecTV, Net Uno, Intercable, and Telefónica have "all received orders from Venezuela's government regulator Conatel to block CNN." 

The move from the current government came on the same day President Donald Trump's administration announced its support for backers of Guaidó. The National Assembly leader's supporters have taken to the streets in an attempt to overthrow President Nicolás Maduro's socialist government in the name of democracy and freedom.

Venezuelan opposition leader and head of the National Assembly Juan Guaido declares self interim president as thousands of people protest against Nicolás Maduro on January 23, 2019 in Caracas, Venezuela. (Getty Images)

 

A senior publicity manager from BBC stated that BBC Global News had also been taken off the air in the South American country, according to The Hill.

Earlier on Tuesday, a CNN broadcast feed had shown military vehicles running over protesters in the country's capital of Caracas. Thousands of masked protesters marched the streets of Caracas on Tuesday and began battles with security forces, throwing stones and facing rubber bullets in response.

At least one person was reportedly crushed under a military vehicle. The clashes occurred hours after the country woke up to Guaido’s video calling for an uprising in the nation. The protests have spread to other cities across the country as well.

Demonstrators during a protest against the government of Nicolas Maduro at Plaza Altamira after opposition leader and head of the National Assembly Juan Guaido declared self interim president on January 23, 2019 in Caracas, Venezuela. (Getty Images)

 

Guaidó, in a series of tweets, said that the plan to end Maduro's "usurpation" was entering its "final phase" and also called on Venezuela's armed forces to join his cause.

"The people of Venezuela began the end of the usurpation," Guaidó tweeted. "In this moment I find myself with the principal units of our Armed Forces initiating the final phase of Operation Liberty."

Hundreds of pro-government protesters also took to streets in Caracas shortly after Maduro promised “nerves of steel”, and his second-in-command, Diosdado Cabello, insisted Guaido’s attempt to seize power would fail, according to reports. 

In an address broadcast on television and the radio on Tuesday evening, Maduro declared victoryover the uprising, congratulating the armed forces for having "defeated this small group that intended to spread violence through putschist skirmishes".

"This will not go unpunished," Maduro said.

In another probable flashpoint, Maduro has called on his supporters to hit the streets in large number on Wednesday.

Multiple countries like the United States, Canada, Brazil, Chile, Argentina, Brazil, Colombia, Peru, Ecuador and Guatemala officially accepted Guaido as the country's leader.