Casey Anthony, who drew public outrage for the death of her daughter Caylee, is now 'ready to have more kids, doesn't care what people think'

Casey Anthony moved to South Florida after the much-publicized murder case and began working as a researcher with one of the private investigators who worked on her case


                            Casey Anthony, who drew public outrage for the death of her daughter Caylee, is now 'ready to have more kids, doesn't care what people think'

Casey Anthony, who was famously acquitted of killing her two-year-old daughter Caylee in 2011, had insisted for years that she did not want any more children. However, it appears that she has changed her mind now after all these years, according to reports.

Casey, who moved to South Florida after the much-publicized murder case, began working as a researcher with one of the private investigators who worked on her case, living a low-key life. The 32-year-old, in an interview with the Associated Press last year, had said that it was unlikely she would have any more children.

Casey Anthony smiles before the start of her sentencing hearing on charges of lying to a law enforcement officer at the Orange County Courthouse July 7, 2011, in Orlando, Florida. (Getty Images)
Casey Anthony smiles before the start of her sentencing hearing on charges of lying to a law enforcement officer at the Orange County Courthouse July 7, 2011, in Orlando, Florida. (Getty Images)

"If I am blessed enough to have another child — if I’d be dumb enough to bring another kid into this world knowing that there’d be a potential that some little snot-nosed kid would then say something mean to my kid — I don’t think I could live with that," Casey said.

However, according to a source close to Casey, she has changed her mind after a year and a half: "For a long time she was like 'no way'. But time has changed that and she’s now open to it in a way she hasn’t been before," PEOPLE reported.

Although Casey realizes that it would be controversial if she had another child, she has reportedly told her friends that other people's opinions don't matter to her anymore.  Casey was described as "one of the most hated women in America" by a spokesperson of the Florida Department of Corrections.

Casey Anthony (R) reacts to being found not guilty on murder charges at the Orange County Courthouse on July 5, 2011, in Orlando, Florida. At left is her attorney Jose Baez. Casey Anthony had been accused of murdering her two-year-old daughter Caylee in 2008. (Getty Images)
Casey Anthony (R) reacts to being found not guilty on murder charges at the Orange County Courthouse on July 5, 2011, in Orlando, Florida. At left is her attorney Jose Baez. Casey Anthony had been accused of murdering her two-year-old daughter Caylee in 2008. (Getty Images)

"She's very good at living her life and to hell with what other people think," the source told PEOPLE. "If she wants to have another kid, she’ll have another kid. She doesn’t care what you or I or anyone else thinks."

For the backstory, on July 15, 2008, Casey's mother Cindy reported that her granddaughter was missing after not seeing her for 31 days and suspected that her daughter Casey had murdered Caylee. She informed authorities that her daughter's car trunk was smelling like a dead body had been there.

Cindy said Casey had given varied explanations as to Caylee's whereabouts before finally telling her that she had not seen Caylee for weeks. Casey lied to detectives, telling them Caylee had been kidnapped by a nanny on June 9, and that she had been trying to find her, too frightened to alert authorities. She was charged with first-degree murder in October 2008 and pleaded not guilty. Caylee's body was discovered in December that year not far away from their home, wrapped in a blanket and put inside a trash bag.

Casey was found not guilty of first-degree murder, aggravated child abuse, and aggravated manslaughter of a child. However, she was found guilty of four misdemeanor counts of providing false information to a law enforcement officer. With her due term served, she was released on July 17, 2011, and was met with public outrage and media trials.