Vicious bulldog rips off man's genitals in disturbing attack, leaves him in a coma

Bulldogs were previously used by butchers to immobilize animals to be slaughtered and were popular up until the 19th century when the bull baiting tradition peaked


                            Vicious bulldog rips off man's genitals in disturbing attack, leaves him in a coma

In a freak incident in an apartment on Haddington's High Street in East Lothian, Scotland, a bulldog bit off a man's genitals and left him comatose. At around 2.30 pm on Sunday, emergency services revealed that they found the victim lying unconscious in a pool of his own blood and realized that he had lost his penis and both testicles. The 22-year-old man was rushed to Edinburgh Royal Infirmary where doctors induced him into a coma. As officers investigate the incident, the dog is being held in a kennel, Daily Mail reports.

A male Olde English Bulldogge. (Wikipedia)
A male Olde English Bulldogge. (Wikipedia)

A Police Scotland spokeswoman said: "Police in East Lothian are investigating after a man suffered serious injuries, believed to have been caused by a dog, in Haddington on Sunday.

Emergency services were called to a property in the High Street area at around 2.30 pm. A 22-year-old man was taken to the Edinburgh Royal Infirmary by the Scottish Ambulance Service and later transferred to the Western General Hospital where he remains receiving treatment. Inquiries into the full circumstances are ongoing."

Authorities are yet to determine whether the hound belonged to the victim. That said, Olde English Bulldoggers were originally bred in the early 1970s in order to recreate the historic Bulldog breed, although with a markedly less aggressive temperament.

Bulldogs were previously used by butchers to immobilize animals to be slaughtered and were popular up until the 19th century when the bull baiting tradition peaked.



However, the indigenous Old English Bulldog breed is now extinct. Although historically popular for bull baiting and other blood sports, the breed declined in number as the popularity of such events waned, especially after the Cruelty to Animals Act was passed in 1835. On the other hand, the Olde English Bulldogge, the original breed's modern descendant, was first bred in the US with the intention of recreating the muscular and athletic traits but without their aggressive tendencies or characteristic health issues.