10-year $484 million renovation of Buckingham Palace will see over 3,000 priceless items 'decanted'

The Queen is ready to move out of her rooms at the Buckingham Palace as a part of the massive £369 million reservicing project takes place


                            10-year $484 million renovation of Buckingham Palace will see over 3,000 priceless items 'decanted'

The Queen is ready to move out of her rooms at the Buckingham Palace as a part of the massive £369 million reservicing, that has already seen more than 3,000 precious items being "decanted," while the extensive work takes place. Her Majesty will be 99-years-old when the work starts on her private quarters in the north wing but it has been said that she is "immensely pragmatic" and will be happy to move back between 2025 and 2027. The work has already started in the palace's east wing. About 200 paintings, 40 chandeliers, and 1,000 trinkets are said to have been removed from the rooms currently undergoing work.

The Daily Mail reported that the project began last year and this means the valuable items have already begun to be carried out of the palace to be put in storage or in various displays. Experts had suggested that the structure could go through a "catastrophic" fire if the 3000 miles of volatile vulcanized rubber cabling is not replaced. Due to the work taking place there will be a major amount of disruption to the palace which has 77 rooms, 1,514 doors, and 760 windows.



 

Reportedly, the project is expected to cost the taxpayers million of pounds with the total price expected to reach £369 million. It has been claimed, however, that the Queen is not the least bit worried of the sudden disturbance. A senior royal offical, who remains anonymous, told reporters: "The Queen is immensely pragmatic and she wants to stay in the palace. She said let me know where you would like me to go."

Coming in the form of general taxation, the Sovereign Grant will be raised significantly during the reservicing in order to cover the costs of it. Workers have already started decanting the East Wing and about 3,000 items of the Royal Collection have been moved so far. 

The master of the Queen's household supervising this project has promised to stay well withing the allotted budget as well as the time it will take to complete the task. Tony Johnstone-Burt said he took up the responsibility of taking care of the public's money "extremely seriously" and is "absolutely convinced" that the 10-year phased plan will have short and long term benefits.



 

He said: "We all take the responsibility that comes with using public funds to do all this work on such a national icon like Buckingham Palace extremely seriously indeed. on time, within budget and to the required specification. I am absolutely convinced that by making this investment in the palace now, will not only avert much more costly and potentially catastrophic failure of the building in the years to come, but in the short term... will provide the opp for even more people to see this remarkable collection."

Work will start in the east wing next week and a compound will be put up for the builders in the forecourt of the palace once the work begins. The east wing is the public part of the palace that has the balcony on which the Queen and her family appear on important events. The palace is reportedly going to be fully open for any state visits and other normal events.

The renovation is being done in the hope that the palace will be fit for use for the next 50 years after the work is completed. Johnstone-Burt said: "We take the responsibility that comes with receiving these public funds extremely seriously indeed. Equally, we are convinced that, by making this investment in Buckingham Palace now, we can avert a much more costly and potentially catastrophic building failure in the years to come."



 

The Prince of Wales is reportedly "fully engaged" with the massive project while the Duke of Edinburgh is closely observing the developments after he was involved with the 1992 Windsor Castle reservicing. 

Of the 3,000 items that have been removed from the palace for the renovation work, about 150 items of decorative arts as well as furniture will go back, on loan, to the Brighton Pavillion, where George IV had acquired them in the early 1800s.