'Breaking Bad' star Bryan Cranston says he's worried about the sanity of Trump and his supporters

The 'Breaking Bad' star joined the growing chorus in criticizing the president over his handling of the pandemic


                            'Breaking Bad' star Bryan Cranston says he's worried about the sanity of Trump and his supporters
Bryan Cranston, Donald Trump (Getty Images)
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It seems Walter White wants to give President Donald Trump some lessons on basic chemistry.

In an impassioned tweet over the weekend — albeit presented with no context — actor Bryan Cranston questioned the sanity of the president and his millions of supporters, Fox News reports.

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The 'Breaking Bad' alum joined the growing chorus of Tinseltown stars in criticizing the president and his administration over his response to the ongoing Covid-19 pandemic. Cranston, who appeared to disapprove of how Trump is guiding the country through the unprecedented crisis, took a jab at the president and his supporters in a tweet on Saturday, April 25.

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Bryan Cranston attends Clayton Kershaw's 7th Annual Ping Pong 4 Purpose at Dodger Stadium on August 08, 2019, in Los Angeles, California(Getty Images)

“I've stopped worrying about the president's sanity. He's not sane,” the 64-year-old actor wrote. “And the realization of his illness doesn't fill me with anger, but with profound sadness. What I now worry about is the sanity of anyone who can still support this deeply troubled man to lead our country.”

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Although Cranston didn't explain why he chose to rail against the president and his supporters, the tweet came amid news coverage of Trump's controversial remarks during a recent coronavirus briefing at the White House, where he appeared to suggest injecting light or disinfectants like Lysol and Dettol into the body as a possible treatment for coronavirus.

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"And then I see the disinfectant where it knocks it out in a minute. One minute. And is there a way we can do something like that by injection inside or, or almost a cleaning? Because you see it gets on the lungs and it does a tremendous number, so it will be interesting to check that. So that you're going to have to use medical doctors. But it sounds, it sounds interesting to me. So we'll see,” the president said at the time. “But the whole concept of the light, the way it kills it in one minute, that's, that's pretty powerful.”

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However, Trump clarified his remarks on Friday, April 24, after his comments drew severe backlash from the public, medical experts, as well as disinfectant manufacturers. He explained that he was only being "sarcastic" to hostile reporters at the briefing.

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“I was asking a question sarcastically to reporters like you,” Trump said. “Disinfectant for doing this, maybe on the hands, would work. I was asking…when they use disinfectant it goes away in less than a minute.”

“I was asking a very sarcastic question to reporters in the room about disinfectants on the inside…that was done in a sarcastic way," he added.

US President Donald Trump pauses during a news briefing on the latest development of the coronavirus outbreak in the US at the James Brady Press Briefing Room at the White House on March 18, 2020, in Washington, DC (Getty Images)

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However, those who watched the briefing were skeptical of the president's clarification. Fox News anchor Bret Baier, after learning of Trump's apparent walk-back, remarked that it "didn't seem like it was coming off as sarcastic when he was talking and turning to Dr. Birx on the side."

Trump's comments came after William Bryan, a Department of Homeland Security (DHS) official who oversees its science and technology unit, detailed his team's initial findings that the novel coronavirus appeared to deteriorate more quickly when it was subjected to higher levels of heat, humidity, and UV rays from the sun.

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The novel coronavirus, or SARS-CoV-2, has ravaged the United States like no other country, which has reported over 965,951 confirmed cases of the virus with a staggering 54,931 deaths, according to data compiled by Johns Hopkins University.

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