'Broke' Series Premiere: Fans find plot similar to 'Indebted', complain the studio laughter is 'over-the-top'

The show sees Pauley Perrette's TV comeback as the dysfunctional single mom Jackie who works two jobs as is very devoted to her little son


                            'Broke' Series Premiere: Fans find plot similar to 'Indebted', complain the studio laughter is 'over-the-top'
(CBS)

Spoilers for 'Broke' Episode 1 'Pilot'

New CBS sitcom 'Broke' just premiered on April 2 and as a stereotypical portrayal of the genre, armed with studio laughter and cliched single moms, the show received mixed reactions. While some people believe the show is exactly the kind of mindless laughter that we need in times like these, others believe the writing and studio laughter are ruining everything. But the negative reactions weren't all related to poor comedy; there were also comparisons with the NBC sitcom 'Indebted' that airs at the same time as the new CBS show and has more or less the same plot. And of course, conservatives were outraged for the show's 'liberal' agenda.

The show sees Pauley Perrette's TV comeback as the dysfunctional single mom Jackie who works two jobs as is very devoted to her little son. To add to Jackie's worries, her hoity-toity sister Elizabeth and her hot, passionate, filthy rich husband, Javier, go broke and turn up at her doorstep to live with her. Javier is a delight and one of the biggest saving graces of the show, as he and his butler Luis have the most wholesome friendship. And while a fan acknowledged all of that, tweeting about it, they also noted: "Good concept, great cast, terrible execution. 15 minutes into the pilot episode and I'm done. Sorry @CBS #Broke ain't for me." 

Another criticized the laugh tracks, tweeting: "Was listening to mom watch #Broke and honestly thought it was a Disney show. The jokes are terribly stilted and the laugh track just makes it worse."

The laugh tracks did get its share of criticism, with fans writing: "BROKE could be a good sitcom if not for the ridiculous phony laughing. Have the producers not heard of Seinfeld, The Office, Modern Family? Don't need you to tell me when to laugh!" And of course, how "The laugh track is way too over-the-top. Not sure I can finish this. They’re trying too hard to be amusing. Writing problem?#Broke."



 

Noting the similarities between 'Broke' and 'Indebted', a fan tweeted, "So #Broke on @CBS is the same exact show as #indebted on @nbc, while another simply asked: "What’s with all the new shows suddenly about being rich and becoming broke and having to move back in with family?" Explaining a bit further, a fan quipped: "Weird that #Indebted and #Broke are on at the same time...both couples lost their money and move in with relatives....Maybe @cbs and @nbc should have talked to one another."

Another just held up the cold reality, sharing: "So, tonight on tv, we could watch #indebted at 9:30 P.M. on @nbc where parents lose their money and move in with their children. Or... We could watch #Broke at 9:30 P.M. on @CBS where parents lose their money and move in with their children. This truly is the #GoldenAgeOfTelevision."

Then there were the conversation fans not at all pleased with the show's insertion of rapid Spanish whenever Javier and Luis speak to each other - one of the most delightful bits in the show. But critics shared: "#Broke on @CBS with @PauleyP was great. But stop the translation thing at the bottom of the screen and just speak English. I can't read that quick."

Another person stated: "Just watched @CBS #Broke for the first/last time. Really was a fan of Abby on NCIS. Too often disappointed to learn real actors' agendas. I'm sure many people in regressive areas of our country will continue watching, but for me and my house, we will choose something enjoyable."

But not all reaction was negative. A clear fan of the show wrote: "Seeing people put down #Broke already breaks my heart. I enjoyed it & believe it provided something our world needs right now. Family, laughter and light-heartedness."

Another one expressed gratitude to the network, tweeting: "@CBS thank you kindly for giving me #Broke & it’s incredible cast definitely a show that’s needed with these hard times."

'Broke' premiered on April 2 and will air weekly episodes on Thursdays at 9:30 pm only on CBS.

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