"He was an aggressive drunk": Kavanaugh lied to committee about the extent of his boozing in college, says classmate

Charles 'Chad' Ludington, a professor at North Carolina State University, came out with a statement on Sunday, saying that he is 'deeply troubled' by Kavanaugh's testimony.


                            "He was an aggressive drunk": Kavanaugh lied to committee about the extent of his boozing in college, says classmate

Another person from President Donald Trump's Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh's past has come forward to confirm the allegations about his drinking habits. This time its Kavanaugh's former classmate from his time in Yale University.

Charles 'Chad' Ludington, a professor at North Carolina State University, came out with a statement on Sunday, saying that he is "deeply troubled" by Kavanaugh's blatant mischaracterization of his drinking habits int he past. 

Ludington said that he was a friend of Kavanaugh's at Yale and used to drink with him, and felt compelled to come forward after hearing the Supreme Court nominee being untruthful about his drinking habits during his testimony in front of the Senate Judiciary Committee.

Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh testifies before the Senate Judiciary Committee on the third day of his Supreme Court confirmation hearing on Capitol Hill September 6, 2018 in Washington, DC. Kavanaugh was nominated by President Donald Trump to fill the vacancy on the court left by retiring Associate Justice Anthony Kennedy.
Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh testifies before the Senate Judiciary Committee on the third day of his Supreme Court confirmation hearing on Capitol Hill September 6, 2018 in Washington, DC. Kavanaugh was nominated by President Donald Trump to fill the vacancy on the court left by retiring Associate Justice Anthony Kennedy.

Kavanaugh's former Yale classmate has come forward just days after the Senate voting for his nomination, and the extraordinary and historic hearing of clinical psychology professor Dr. Christine Blasey Ford, who publicly detailed her sexual assault allegations against Kavanaugh in front of the Senate Judiciary Committee last week.

Ford's testimony, which was painful to watch for many, was widely seen as credible as she asked for an FBI investigation into her claims and stood in stark contrast to Kavanaugh's, who not even once conceded to an FBI investigation, repeatedly suggesting that the Senate hearing was enough. The judge has also been accused of sexual misconduct by two other women — Deborah Ramirez and Julie Swetnick. Kavanaugh, however, has denied all the allegations.

The Senate Judiciary Committee subsequently agreed on an FBI investigation into the allegations after Republican Senator Jeff Flake said that he would withdraw his vote if the investigation is not conducted. 

Sen. Jeff Flake (R-AZ) listens to Democratic senators speak during a Senate Judiciary Committee meeting on September 28, 2018 in Washington, DC. The committee met to discuss and later vote on the nomination of Judge Brett Kavanaugh to the U.S. Supreme Court prior to the nomination proceeding to a vote in the full U.S. Senate.
Sen. Jeff Flake (R-AZ) listens to Democratic senators speak during a Senate Judiciary Committee meeting on September 28, 2018 in Washington, DC. The committee met to discuss and later vote on the nomination of Judge Brett Kavanaugh to the U.S. Supreme Court prior to the nomination proceeding to a vote in the full U.S. Senate.

Ludington, in his statement, said that in addition to being a "frequent and heavy drinker," Kavanaugh was also "belligerent and aggressive" when drunk, according to the Daily Mail.

"On many occasions, I heard Brett slur his words and saw him staggering from alcohol consumption, not all of which was beer," he said. "When Brett got drunk, he was often belligerent and aggressive."

"On one of the last occasions I purposely socialized with Brett, I witnessed him respond to a semi-hostile remark, not by defusing the situation, but by throwing his beer in the man's face and starting a fight that ended with one of our mutual friends in jail," Ludington continued.

Kavanaugh's former classmate also added that he plans to speak to the FBI and believes that the Supreme Court nominee downplayed the "degree and frequency" of his drinking during the Senate hearing, reports state.

 

Christine Blasey Ford testifies before the U.S. Senate Judiciary Committee at the Dirksen Senate Office Building on Capitol Hill September 27, 2018 in Washington, DC. Blasey Ford, a professor at Palo Alto University and a research psychologist at the Stanford University School of Medicine, has accused Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh of sexually assaulting her during a party in 1982 when they were high school students in suburban Maryland.
Christine Blasey Ford testifies before the U.S. Senate Judiciary Committee at the Dirksen Senate Office Building on Capitol Hill September 27, 2018 in Washington, DC. Blasey Ford, a professor at Palo Alto University and a research psychologist at the Stanford University School of Medicine, has accused Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh of sexually assaulting her during a party in 1982 when they were high school students in suburban Maryland.

 

"I can unequivocally say that in denying the possibility that he ever blacked out from drinking, and in downplaying the degree and frequency of his drinking, Brett has not told the truth,' Ludington said. 

According to the New York Times, FBI agents have asked Ludington to meet them at the bureau's Raleigh office on Monday. 

Kavanaugh, during his testimony ahead of the Senate, had denied ever blacking out from drinking alcohol or sexually assaulting anyone, which stands in contrast to Dr. Ford's allegations that he and his friend Mark Judge were intoxicated when they sexually assaulted her in the 1980s.