"Blu" species from 'Rio' probably extinct in the wild: Study

Blu was probably way too late to save Jewel as studies suggest she was probably extinct 11 years before he even met her.


                            "Blu" species from 'Rio' probably extinct in the wild: Study

Remember Blu, the Spix' Macaw, from the 2011 animated movie 'Rio'? As the last known existing bird of his species, Blu is unable to fly and hence sets out on a daunting quest when he has to mate with the last-known wild member of his species, Jewel. However, it seems that Blu's meet with Jewel is now a thing of the past.

A recent study has revealed that the wild Spix Macaws had perished around the year 2000, although the species continues to exist in captive populations- a lot like Blu who was aided upon by the bookshop owner, Linda. While the wild population of the species has already perished, the ones in captivity are endangered since they are mostly utilized for trading purposes which in itself results in habitat loss.

Sadly, the birds are expected to have been extinct in Brazil which also served as the location of the 2011 animated film, where the destruction of specific gallery woodland habitat has led to the mass removal of the species. 

 



 

A new study by BirdLife International suggests that the Spix's Macaw Cyanopsitta is probably one of the eight species whose extinction is not yet confirmed but is deemed highly likely. According to the three quantifying factors-consisting of the intensity of threats, timing, and reliability of records, and the timing and quantity of search efforts for the species- which were considered to analyze the 51 Critically Endangered species, five of the eight species were either confirmed or suspected to be extinct.

The study also states that these extinctions took place on the South American continent, as a result of the deadly effects of deforestation. 

 

Maybe Blu and Linda were trying to send out a message of caution. (IMDb)
Maybe Blu and Linda were trying to send out a message of caution. (IMDb)

Dr. Stuart Butchart, BirdLife’s Chief Scientist and lead author on the paper said, "Ninety percent of bird extinctions in recent centuries have been of species on islands. However, our results confirm that there is a growing wave of extinctions sweeping across the continents, driven mainly by habitat loss and degradation from unsustainable agriculture and logging”.

All of this might just leave on to speculate if 'Rio' as a film was actually set in the past and was trying to give out a deeper message.