Avicii leaves staggering $25.5 million fortune to his parents after tragic death

After the Swedish DJ was found dead in Muscat, Oman, in April this year, his entire fortune automatically went to his parents as he was single at the time with no children


                            Avicii leaves staggering $25.5 million fortune to his parents after tragic death

According to legal documents filed in Sweden, legendary electronic artiste Avicii has left his entire £20million ($25.5 million) fortune to his parents.

Klas Bergling and Anki Lidén are set to inherit their son's wealth of a staggering 231million kronor ($25.5million), as revealed by legal forms made public by the Swedish Tax Agency. Avicii, whose real name was Tim Bergling, was found dead in Muscat, Oman, in April this year. In a statement after his death, the family penned an open letter saying the 28-year-old "could not go on any longer and wanted peace."

DJ Avicii performs onstage during Rolling Stone Live SF with Talent Resources on February 7, 2016, in San Francisco, California. (Getty Images)
DJ Avicii performs onstage during Rolling Stone Live SF with Talent Resources on February 7, 2016, in San Francisco, California. (Getty Images)

Due to the fact that Avicii was unmarried with no children and had not written a last will and testament at the time of his death, the money will automatically be gifted to his parents under Swedish law, according to Swedish newspaper Expressen.se.

The internationally acclaimed star had outstanding debts in the US and in Canada to the tune of 96.5million kronor ($10.8m) and 841,330 kronor ($94,144) respectively, which were paid off before handing the estate over to his parents.

Avicii performs at the MLB Fan Cave on October 1, 2013, in New York City. (Getty Images)
Avicii performs at the MLB Fan Cave on October 1, 2013, in New York City. (Getty Images)

According to the GQ, Avicii had made a fortune in his short career, making $28million in 2014 alone, earning $250,000 a night and playing out sold-out shows across the globe. Speaking of his massive earnings back in 2013, Avicii said that he "noticed straight away when I started making money, that I don't need that much money." He was a humanitarian at heart, donating over one million dollars — the entire income of his 2012 U.S. tour — to hunger relief charity Feeding America. The following year, he went a step ahead and donated one million euros to Radiohjälpen, a Swedish aid organization.

After his tragic demise which shocked the world, his family released a statement saying Avicii had been struggling with mental health issues at the time of his death and did not want to go on. "He really struggled with thoughts about Meaning, Life, Happiness. He could not go on any longer. He wanted to find peace," the statement read.

Kygo ends his set with an emotional tribute to Avicii during the 2018 Coachella Valley Music And Arts Festival at the Empire Polo Field on April 20, 2018, in Indio, California. (Getty Images)
Kygo ends his set with an emotional tribute to Avicii during the 2018 Coachella Valley Music And Arts Festival at the Empire Polo Field on April 20, 2018, in Indio, California. (Getty Images)

Avicii announced in 2016 that he would no longer perform live despite an illustrious career since the release of his hit-single 'Le7els' in 2011. According to reports, he was suffering from severe stress and alcohol abuse coupled with anxiety.

Avicii was burned out under the extreme pressure of performing about 320 shows in a single year, according to a recent documentary titled 'Avicii: True Stories'. In the film, Avicii spoke frequently about using alcohol as a crutch to be able to perform and drinking every day to deal with crippling anxiety and stress.

After years of excessive drinking, the self-confessed introvert was diagnosed with acute pancreatitis at the young age of 21. Avicii was once again hospitalized in 2014 to have his gallbladder and appendix removed, Daily Mail reports.