Boy swallows two houseflies that bothered him during live interview, bizarre video goes viral

A viewer had zoomed in on the boy's face just as he swiftly gulped the flies while he was standing outside his home along with his family


                            Boy swallows two houseflies that bothered him during live interview, bizarre video goes viral
(Getty Images)

An Australian boy was seen eating two houseflies - one after the other - during a live television interview. The video has now gone viral.

An edited version of Channel 10's 'The Project' interview, which zoomed in on the boy's face just as he swiftly ate a couple of insects bothering him while he stood outside his home with his family during a televised interview, was uploaded on Reddit. The family of four was busy discussing the drought conditions that it has been facing and struggling against for years.

While the program was aimed to analyze the impact of the recent rainfall in the area on rural communities, an eagle-eyed viewer noticed the youngest family member being briefly distracted by a fly that was perching itself on various parts of his face. However, when the fly came close to the boy's mouth, he opened his mouth wide enough to let his tongue out. Before anyone could notice, the fly was gone.

Within a fraction of a second, a second fly, sitting close to his lips met the same fate. The boy did not appear to be chewing on the insect and it seemed like he simply had swallowed it whole. Immediately after eating the flies, the boy flashed a wide grin for the camera.

The viewer who recorded the zoomed-in version of the video by pointing a camera at the TV set was heard exclaiming, "Oh! He got two of them!" before bursting into laughter in the background.

While most of the people who came across the bizarre video on Reddit were too shocked to comment, some defended the boy, saying that in a drought-affected area, non-poisonous insects can be a source of sustenance. 

"When you're in a drought, flies can be an important source of protein," one of them commented.

However, a second one perplexedly wrote: "How is it that flies can dodge a fast-moving hand but can't dodge a slow-moving tongue?"

Quentin Grafton, a water expert and economics professor at the Australian National University in Canberra, said that while the rain showers helped stop the deadly bushfires that have been plaguing different parts of the country for months, one cannot be sure if it replenished the dry inland areas, which have been facing a three-year-long drought since the water was not distributed evenly across all affected areas.

"At this stage, it's very good news, and certainly much more than people could have wished for or expected. There are some very happy people," Grafton told Metro.

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