Scientists discover MYSTERIOUS holes on Atlantic Ocean floor, sparks bizarre theories

NOAA posted photos that show the holes were found in what is otherwise a flat sandy surface


                            Scientists discover MYSTERIOUS holes on Atlantic Ocean floor, sparks bizarre theories
Scientists discovered the holes close to the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (NOAA Ocean Exploration/Facebook)
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1.7 miles beneath the surface of the Atlantic Ocean, researchers found some inexplicable, strange holes. They urged Facebook followers to assist them by identifying the distinctive indentations that create a straight line. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Ocean Exploration uploaded pictures of these dents on Facebook.

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They captioned the pictures: "Okay Facebookers, time to get out those scientist hats! On Saturday's #Okeanos dive, we observed several of these sublinear sets of holes in the sediment. These holes have been previously reported from the region, but their origin remains a mystery. While they look almost human-made, the little piles of sediment around the holes make them seem like they were excavated by... something."

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The divers are a part of NOAA's Voyage to the Ridge 2022, a set of three ocean investigations that involve mapping and a remotely controlled vehicle to learn more about deepwater regions around the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, Azores Plateau, and Charlie-Gibbs Fracture Zone. The divers use NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer to dive and explore.

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NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer (NOAA Website)
NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer (NOAA Website)

 

"What's YOUR hypothesis?" they questioned netizens in regards to the holes discovered close to the Mid-Atlantic Ridge.

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Facebook commenters offered a variety of views on what may have caused the noticeable, uniform-appearing dents in the ocean bottom.
 
One commented: "I wonder if some company may be conducting seafloor samples. That might explain the straight lines and the spacing of the holes. Especially if you have seen others in the region. Only thing is, everything else around it doesn't seem like it's been disturbed."
 
A second wrote: "Upwelling! Freshwater from a land source bubbling up? As if there's a rock under there allowing the flowing water to break through in that linear manner."
 
"I'm not saying it was the aliens...but it was the aliens," a third said, sharing a meme.
 
A user tried to give a reasonable explanation for the dents: "This to me looks like the sediment is falling through, or water flowing up from a crack in a geological shelf or cave roof. I suspect either ancient coral or some sedimentary rock structure underneath has a void for which material is being washed out further away. I would start to see if there was any caves or deformation in the seabed. "
 
The Mid-Atlantic Range is the world's longest mountain range and one of the Earth's most remarkable geological features. It spans 10,000 miles across the Atlantic Ocean from north to south. It's still completely undiscovered because the majority of it is underwater. It also frequently experiences earthquakes and is the location of stunning hydrothermal vents, which can develop as magma rises to the surface and generates heat.

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This article contains remarks made on the Internet by individual people and organizations. MEAWW cannot confirm them independently and does not support claims or opinions being made online.